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  1. Saturday we got off work (newspaper factory) at around 5:00 pm, which is pretty dang good. We were shootin' for 4:30 - 5:00. Anyway, I was doing around 3-4 machines at a time, which obviously knocks someone out. I was in a grumpy mood whenever someone said something about a machine light going off and whatnot.

    Came home around 5:20, grumpy mood and all, then fell asleep a little over ten minutes later. Didn't wake up until 10:08 pm. After that, I went to bed in my room and had to get up at 8 for a store meeting at the pet store I work at.

    14 hours of sleep, people. Wow. I haven't slept like that in a long while.
  2. *busts a cap*

    SRSLY.

    Oh--My--God. I'm so sick of some of the fantasy names that I've been reading. Listen, I know they can't be something out of the ordinary from the world. But come on. Make them pronounceable and reasonable to your story. Check some of these out that I've read in a single chapter of someone's work.

    -----

    Vappu
    - I instantly thought of the Pokemon named Vaporeon as soon as I saw the character's name. Aside from this, look up the name on Google. Quite interesting, really. A day when the whole of Finland is drunk.

    Liskin
    - A parody name of the word "Listen"?

    King Gadwalader
    - First pronunciation that came to my mind was "God's wallop". I don't even know why, but this name is somewhat absurd enough to be that.

    Sage
    - Not necessarily a bad name for the fantasy genre, but it's becoming too overused as a name. I wouldn't mind a remodel of the name, such as: Saij or Saihj. Something...different. Some fantasy names are just becoming cliches. Majorly.

    Sacha-Gailia
    - I bust out laughing at this one. Pronunciation in my mind: Such-a-gay-lia'. LMAO. Who wouldn't laugh at that? One of the poorer names in the fantasy realm.

    Takvor
    - I don't know about this one. Every time I read it I think of this ugly ogre. "Me Takvor. Me want to thump you on head." Ugh.

    -----

    Okay, enough of those, even if there are more. My mind was threatening to explode just to make me stop reading all of them.

    What I'm getting at is, think about the names you're going to use. Sure, you can pull some out of a black hat and slap it on a character's forehead. But make sure it fits or the reader won't want to lob the character off of a bridge with sharp rocks at the bottom.

    Names define people. Think about you being that character. Would you want to grow up in life knowing your name sounded like a black person saying, "Such a gay lia'"? No offense, of course. I'm friends with a lot of black people, and every time I make fun of one person's phrases, he says, "I'm black, it's who we talk, aight?" Cracks me up, but whatever.

    Well, that's all about names on my part.
  3. Yes, I watch Fantastic Four a lot. Shaddap.

    Adverb: a word or phrase that modifies or qualifies an adjective, verb, or other adverb or a word-group, expressing a relation of place, time, circumstance, manner, cause, degree, etc.​

    *takes out a baseball bat, thumping it against the palm of her hand* ...Man, that hurts after a while. *tosses bat over shoulder*

    Adverbs are overused, and it's not funny. I get a headache by reading too many in just five paragraphs. Over half of them aren't even needed, thank you! Why choose an adverb when you can put in a verb or adjective that can say more? I don't like over 100 buggy eyes glaring at me through the screen. It frightens me.

    Without using a lot of the -ly adverbs, you can tighten up your sentence structures. With them...it's almost like you're calling the reader stupid, because they won't figure out another word that may be better. Or heck, you may be telling us you're too lazy to use a better verb/adjective.

    Not good.

    Imagine going outside on the back porch. Your neighbor's house to the left has a beautiful garden with a wide array of flowers. Your neighbor's house to the right puts you to shame. Their lawn hasn't been cut in more than two weeks and the same old dandelions are marking their territory on the land.

    This is how it is with adverbs. Why let them grow and spread? Why not trim them to build your own beautiful garden?

    Let's read some examples of the ridiculous -ly adverbs.

    • She spoke softly.
    • He ran quickly.
    • The image is beautifully rendered.
    • John hated her immensely.

    With all of these, you're telling us instead of showing anything. How soft did she speak? How fast did he run? What makes the image beautifully rendered? How bad did John hate her? Let the reader be the character for the moment. We don't care to be told what's going on, let us use our senses.

    Tell me, would you rather read the above, or the below?

    • She whispered.
    • He ran faster than a cheetah on a sugar rush.
    • The image contained beauty that words couldn't describe.
    • John abhorred her.

    True, a few of them are downright insane to write. But would you prefer to show the reader a bit more, or would you rather plopping an adverb down and calling it a day?

    Now that you know I hate the -ly adverbs, let's delve a bit deeper into the adverb world. You already have examples on them modifying verbs, so I'll give you others.

    1. Adverbs modify adjectives. In the examples, the adjectives will be in italics, and the adverbs in boldface.
      • an openly creepy look
      • a very fun evening
      • a seriously horrendous accident
    2. Adverbs modify adverbs. In the examples, the adverbs being modified will be in italics, and the adverbs modifying that adverb is in boldface.
      • She had a regretfully lonely gaze.
      • The ballerina landed more gracefully than before.
      • That guy eats almost boorishly.
  4. Here's a bunch of terms used in editting to help you all out a bit--for those who don't know what some of the terms mean, that is. Something for everyone to gander at, including myself. I'll get into the grammar terms later, one by one. Hopefully :p


    All cap (caps; full caps) - Text that's in CAPITALS
    Ampersand - Name for the & character
    At sign - Name for the @ character

    Bold - Name for boldface text
    Braces - Name for the { } characters
    Brackets - Name for the < > characters
    Bullet - Heavy dot used as an ornament or to being a vertical list

    Close paren. - Name for the ) character
    Curly Quotes (smart quotes) - Name for the " " characters

    Ellipsis - Name for the . . . character
    Em dash - Name for the — character
    En dash - Half an em dash, name for the – character
    End-line hyphen - Hyphen that falls off the end of the line of a text

    Hard hyphen - Used to join certain compound words (e.g., blue-eyed)

    Intercap (midcap) - Name for the capital letters that appear in the middle of a company or product name (e.g., WordPerfect)

    Open paren. - Name for the ( character

    Serial comma - Comma preceding and or or
    Slash (solidus; slant; virgule) - Name for the / character
    Small caps - Capital letters that are shorter than regular caps (e.g., A.M., P.M.)
    Soft hyphen - A hyphen that appears at the end of a line to indicate the word continues on the next line
    Strikeout - Name for striking out a word or words

    Typo - Short for typographical error
  5. What do you think about novels regarding deities? I wanted to create a new twist to them, not just the fact that, "They're there Just Because." Basically, there are two children from the Creator deity. Kaorii, the shadow goddess and Vyce, the purity god. I wasn't sure to make a neutral god or not, so I decided that the Creator makes sure everything is fair in the making, and that his children play fair.

    Each book is one greater deity trying to top their sibling. An example would be in one book, the disease god comes to be. The next book would be how the god of truth comes into existence. In simpler terms, Kaorii would say, "Look, my child can create diseases with one breath." Then Vyce counters with, "You think you're so smart, don't you, Sister? Well, I've created a child of light." And so on and so forth.

    Each deity has a symbol and a spirit ward. There are no "Chosen Ones" in this series. The people are random. Everyone comes across a certain obstacle, and some type of object that invokes the spirit ward. After completing a certain quest, they rank in the world of Genesy--the realm of gods.

    If you're confused on the subject of this, then let me introduce the first book idea of the series.
    In the first book, the greater deitys' powers mix into one object. A necklace. Kammie gets this necklace on her birthday, and after watching the moon for a few minutes, the moon's beams hitting the necklace invokes the spirit wards. Two wolves--one light and one dark suddenly appear in front of her. After their disappearance, Kammie tries to forget about them, but can't. She dreams of them and they explain themselves to a certain extent. Her quest is to stop a greater spirit from devouring the souls of anything it comes across.

    What'cha think of it? :rolleyes: