Color
Background color
Background image
Border Color
Font Type
Font Size
  1. Okay, so I really think this whole SJW thing needs to be addressed. Both in the sense of further discouraging them and blocking them, and in the sense of it being a problematic talking point. The problem with this talking point is that inevitablely becomes associated with the whole group,because people talk about it too much. For the same reason the stereotypes of flaming Christian homophobe or racist redneck Trump voter should be dealt with equally carefully to avoid that same problem. If there's one thing pissing me off recently it's people who seem unwilling to respectfully and rationally discuss a nuance view of politics. It's far too often like a war, and you just hate on whatever is other. And like a war you are taught to see the worst in the enemy. It's not about authoritarian SjWs or angry unyielding bigots, these are just versions of extremity. Have you ever noticed hat the most authoritarian political situations ended up more comparable than their more fair counterparts? Because you start taking on qualities of extremity; drawing on over-tribalism and sheer irrationality. Let's try to avoid this more shall we? I think recent political ideas and events show that this kind of thinking is becoming invasive. We have to dismantle the character assassination and address specific points and people as their own and with respect for the complicate and ultimately somewhat subjective nature of the discussion. Because remember: there is no right answer in politics. Not entirely. Only in lucky examples.
    Peace! Thank you for your time! Have a beautiful day!:blowkiss::blowkiss:
    Malisky likes this.
  2. I'm baaaack!
    Okay, so an interesting thing for me is to question things. It's an important value. "Question everything" as they say. Now, I've been looking at this site recently one or two times, because I like to look at the other side of things. Now, this site is on the Southern Poverty Law Center hate group list. And it's not hard to see why since there's so confident and relentless. (Though I notice most of the articles are written by the leader, I suspect there's not that many members in this group, especially given all the competing groups) Something interesting they bring up however, that I've seen before and always wondered about, is the explicitness involved in some pride events. You get images like this; [​IMG]
    And this:
    [​IMG]
    Displaying nudity and language. Now, language isn't too bad, but considering some people wear revealing costumes or do what's depicted above, isn't there a legal concern about public indecency laws? And how often does this stuff show up? Since I haven't been to one myself because I am kind of shy about it, (weirdly) I'd love to hear from people who have to better understand these events.
    (P.S if you've had bad experiences with these kinds of people, don't read their site. It might really hurt your feelings because they are quite disdainful. I am mostly just amused but I'm not you, I'm very comfortable and happy and a bit innocent)
    Thank you for your time! Hope you have a good day! :blowkiss::blowkiss:
    cydney likes this.
  3. Okay, so I promised I would do the sequel and here it is! Now that we've done something to address the notion of Australian being full of dangerous animals, let's talk about what some of what actually is. These, you should be afraid of. Though, they are just animals, don't think of them as evil. And as a pacifist and animal rights believer, I must stress killing these animals in revenge hunts adds nothing but more death.

    [​IMG]

    The Inland Taipan is the most venomous snake in the world. It is probably one of the biggest contributors to fears about Australian wildlife. ""OMG, Australia has the most venomous snake in the world!"But the Inland Taipan is also one of the less aggressive snakes. It's quite shy and prefers to run. It uses it's venom to kill prey and to deter predators. So you'll be fine unless you piss it off, the main risk is accidentally stepping on one, which is luckily uncommon since they like the arid places.

    [​IMG]

    The Coastal Taipan is the third most venomous snake. Unlike the Inland, it is quite territorial and bitey, and tends closer to the more populated coasts. This includes the most populated region, NSW, although snakes avoid humans generally. It is larger than the Inland too. So, the Coastal is actually more lethal to humans. Don't think people just get killed all the time though, you can still just give it a safe berth and it will leave you.

    [​IMG]

    The Stonefish is one of the most venomous fish. It is also exceptionally camoflaged, when in the ground it looks much like a rock. And it uses this to catch fish. But it's poisonous spines that protect are also easily stepped on by unsuspecting divers. And when this happens it can be fatal. The main relief is that this animal isn't usually encountered by humans, so it doesn't cause much damage.

    [​IMG]

    The Blue-Ringed Octopus is one of a small list of venomous octopi. They is quite small, and so uses it's venom to kill prey and defend itself. It is quite venomous, so should be taken seriously. However, like many animals here, with one exception, it has no reason to attack humans outside of defense, and this one isn't very aggressive. Just don't bug it when you see one.

    upload_2016-8-17_23-46-13.jpeg

    The Blue Bottle (Portuguese Man of War) is a colony of jellyfish relatives. It has a very painful sting, that can be fatal. In case it isn't obvious, these things don't attack you so much as touch you accidentally. It has a nasty tendency to end up beached, where it can be stepped on. Fortunately, it is relatively easy to spot, most incidents occur at night with drunken idiots who go swimming after having some stag night or whatever.


    Okay, so those are all dangerous, but they don't freak me out really. Not like this does. To me at least, this is the scariest, though actually not the most fatal, Australian animal.

    upload_2016-8-17_23-46-40.jpeg

    The Saltwater Crocodile is the largest crocodilian in the world. It has a tremendous bite force, and is also territorial and doesn't mind the taste of human at all. :nosleep:They are most common in the Northern Territory where they have this handy guide if you want to go swimming; https://nt.gov.au/emergency/community-safety/crocodile-safety-be-crocwise/introduction. Don't worry, they're not super common and even they aren't THAT aggressive. They can even be kept safely in zoos, and handled by professional keepers.
    But, just look at that face. Imagine it swimming slowly towards you at night, unseen, ready for an ambush...

    Again please don't hate any of these animals for having defense systems and/or predatory behaviour! It's not like humans don't kill other animals (and each other) back! Just be safe!

    Thank you for your time! Have a beautiful day!:blowkiss::blowkiss:
  4. Okay, so to be clear this is my opinion. This isn't "why it is factually for certain" although I do find it rather simple. In my very strong personal opinion, cultural appropriation is a meaningless concept. Let me provide you with the perfect example.
    .
    In this video this woman, who believes it is appropriate to only respect black viewers despite marketing civil rights, (Segregation anyone?) explains how she believes black ghetto culture belongs to it's inventors. (She also misrepresents the argument against her) (Also, dividing people's culture by race?) Which is an okay point, despite my moral misgivings. Until you realize her username (incorrectly) uses a Greek academic term and a French word (correctly). And that English is littered with other languages, and we use their cultures. Do the ancient Greeks own democracy? Do the Romans own plumbing? Do the French own baguettes? Do the Chinese own tea? Does India own Buddhism? Heck, does the Middle East own the Abrahamic religions, seeing as they started there? (Including Christianity) If cultural appropriation is a thing why do we spend so much goddamn time not respecting this supposed principle of cultural ownership? Now, I'm not saying white people should scream "nigga!" at black people or whatever. That would be very rude. And some uses can come off as condescending (The Washington Redskins). But I am saying the promotion of cultural ownership flies in the face of how often we have elements of other cultures in our lives. It is hypocrisy for each and every one of us, because we're all involved in borrowing. So maybe when someone wants to join in on your culture, you might want to consider not excluding them because of race (Are we "separate but equal"?) Why do you need ownership of this thing? Just consider it. I'd argue that people wanting to join in on your culture to be often a positive thing, because that shows people think of it in a positive way. It's now "cool".
    Thank you for your time! Have a beautiful day! :blowkiss::blowkiss:
    Malisky likes this.
  5. Okay, so you guys all know the stereotype that Australia is full of deadly animals. And we do have some notable examples, and a general tendency towards it. But I guarantee you it is not so-many-deadly-animals-all-over-the-place-oh-god-how-does-anyone-live-here. Though that might seem like a crazy idea.:supergrin:
    So I'm going to talk about how damn cute some of our human-friendly native marsupials are. Along the way I may or may not turn into a wildlife advocate. :superwink:

    [​IMG]

    The Bilbi is a small harmless insectivore (insect eater) that lives in the desert. It actually has very soft fur. They are quite endangered so any of you who feel like being charitable and can donate money online could give to one of multiple Bilbi conservation funds. https://taronga.org.au/conservation/wildlife-conservation/conservation-partnerships/greater-bilby.

    [​IMG]

    This is the rock wallaby. There are multiple species and they are all bloody adorable. There are also a bit endangered so feel free to donate to conservation funds for them. They're not as lucky as their larger, more evolutionarily durable relatives.

    upload_2016-6-4_14-42-21.jpeg

    Brushtail possums are quite cute. My dog hates them but I love them coming over to check out our mango tree. We're building a possum house for the vulnerable little 'uns. :supercute: Luckily these guys are doing okayish.


    [​IMG]

    Wombats. You've all heard of them. They're cute, 'kay. (Don't fuck with them though they are furry tanks) Not so endangered but they're a little vulnerable ecologically.

    [​IMG]

    The shy but harmless sugar glider is extremely cute. If you cannot recognize this you have something wrong with you. They have only one rival for the cutest Auzzie animal:


    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Quokka's are so cute and friendly they started an adorable internet meme called Quokka selfies about them. Be warned: your brain may not be able to handle the cute. :supercute::supercute::supercute:
    Unfortunately these guys are so friendly they are extremely endangered (damn you past humans!!!) and exist only on a few islands. Definitely donate to help these guys. http://www.quokkarescue.org/.
    This link has a bunch of cool Auzzie animals (including all those mentioned here) for anyone interested in doing a little biology reading. https://taronga.org.au/animals

    Thank you for your time. Hope you have a good day.:blowkiss::blowkiss: