Historical Fiction Group

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How do you tackle words with no English equivalent in your works? I have a handful of words that I'm just not sure what to do with. They appear in my WIP, but I'm not sure the best way to approach them. Whenever I use a foreign word I've been italicizing it and defining it in text or providing a footnote.

Example of in text:
She had been visited by Dagda and had not known until after he was gone. He said he was named after his virtues: Dago-, good; dā, give. How could she have been so daft?

Example of footnote:
"Tu kwe- Mi kei- kom Klara," he said, grateful that the Scythians did not speak their tongue. They hoped that by dividing the party they would also divide the Scythians attention.
1. You and I go with Klara.

But what do you do with something like this?
After the events of Lughnasad, Klara had no intention of catching up to the party of Kenetlo-.
Would you do something like this:
After the events of Lughnasad, a month long harvest festival dedicated to the God, Lugh, Klara had no intention of catching up to the party of Kenetlo-, a group of people who live along the Rhine and Danube.
Or would you do something like this:
After the events of Lughnasad, Klara had no intention of catching up to the party of Kenetlo-.
1. A month long harvest festival dedicated to the God, Lugh. 2. A group of people who live along the Rhine and Danube.

Or can I just ignore it as I have done above?
I'm going to be using Kenetlo-; Kelto-/Keltā-, quite a bit, as well as words like Lughnasad, Imbolg, etc. Do I italicize them every time, just once, or not at all?
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