1. claire_h
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    claire_h New Member

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    1st person and unreliable narrator

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by claire_h, Aug 8, 2012.

    I am having a dilemma as to which path to take and would appreciate any input.

    MC1 (male) and MC 2(female)

    The end of the book we find that the daughter of MC1&2 seeks out MC1 to find out what happened to her mother and MC1 is retelling his story to her. She doesn’t know MC1 is her father (yet). The ending is that MC1 murdered MC2 and attempted to murder the daughter too in a murder-suicide after a mental breakdown caused by WW2

    I can’t figure out where to write from a 1st person POV of MC1 interspersed with diary entries from MC2 or write from 3rd person perspectives for both MC1 and MC2 with the assumption that the story of MC2 is taken from diary entries by her daughter.

    If I go down the 1st person POV route, I don’t want the narrator is appear ‘unreliable’ however I have read in forums that diary entries and not particularly well received. The 3rd person route my not fit it somehow.

    Any suggestions?
     
  2. CH878
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    CH878 Active Member

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    I would avoid actually writing out diary entries, they can be tedious and are often unrealistic.

    What about first person from the perspective of the daughter? You'd still be using third person to talk about MC1 and 2. That would create a more reliable narrator.
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    I'm not a huge fan of epistolary writing (telling a story through letters or journal entries). Although it used to be highly favored (read Bram Stoker's Dracula or Mary Shelley's Frankenstein), it places an emotional distance between the reader and the actual events.
     

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