1. veronasteve
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    veronasteve New Member

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    $64.000 question.

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by veronasteve, Jun 25, 2009.

    whats the best (easiest ) genre to write , to get published.....
    i know you might say well if it's good it stands a chance whichever one you choose,but is there one or two that (childrens or sci-fi) theres more of a market for??
     
  2. TragicJuliet
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    TragicJuliet Senior Member

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    If you're writing just to be published- then sadly, you probably won't ever get published because you don't have that passion it requires- that thing that makes it stick out above the rest and makes the publishers want to market it. The best genre to write, is the genre that feels closest to you're heart. Yes sometimes it seems that fantasy/sci-fi make it big (I.E- Harry Potter, Twilight, Eragon , Lord of the Rings) but that could be just because little kids as well as older people like fantasy as well. IT ALSO could be that only the movie itself is big and they just have great ways of advertising and making it seem big. The Notebook, Marley and Me, Stephen King books in general, are all mixed genres as well and have made it big.

    So I believe that if you want a chance to get published- seriously then you need to have two things : Passion and Persistence. Just keep writing about what you love, what you know, and those words will show the passion. If you can't stand the History why write a book that you'll have to spend months, maybe YEARS on, about World War Two?
     
  3. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    It's the one that YOU can write well. Even if a certain genre publishes a whole lot more than another, what's the point of writing it if you aren't sure you can do it justice or if you don't like it?
     
  4. veronasteve
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    veronasteve New Member

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    so i need passion,and love and have really got to dig my subject....ok thats given me an idea.:confused::)
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    plus, you also need to have the requisite talent and skill!
     
  6. ManhattanMss
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    ManhattanMss Contributing Member

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    Finding a publisher has more to do with how well something is written than what genre it is. And excellence in writing anything probably wouldn't qualify as "easy." I imagine you already know that.

    Aside from that, genre writing (any genre) is likely to have clearer guidelines to follow than non-genre writing (which is simply everything else). And genre writing is easier than non-genre work to market because niche audiences can be identified (so it's also easier to determine what readers of particular genres actually like).

    So, if you couple a genre with your personal reading preferences and interests, YOU as an author would probably stand a better chance in that particular genre than you would in one you have no personal interest in (reading or writing).

    I'd also say that "... if it's good it stands a chance ..." of being rejected by someone who actually reads it. It'll probably have to be better than "good" to stand any chance at all of being published by a bona fide, royalty-paying company. (Maybe you already know that, too.)

    There are plenty of statistics (manipulated now and again) on the internet that'll give you a clue as to what's popular and what's less so (romance and mystery seem to rate pretty high). You can also check out your local Barnes & Noble to see what's stocked on their shelves and how it's placed there for consumers. Check out best seller lists to see what folks are actually buying (and there are statistics to show who's buying and reading it). For comparisons like this, think dollars--plain and simple. It's largely (if not all) about the business of making a buck, so competition is stiff. And THAT's why the writing must be comparatively top-notch--in any genre--to rise to the surface of a given publisher's slushpile.
     
  7. TragicJuliet
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    TragicJuliet Senior Member

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    well yes of course that too- :redface: figured that part was implied (passion leads to honing skills?) maybe it's not to some
     
  8. veronasteve
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    veronasteve New Member

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    yes indeed, the proof is in the pudding (think thats right).

    btw i wasn't asking "how can i make a lot of money writing a book"..i know that the work has to be very well done,
    but like has been said mystery and romance are two subjects that people have a desire to read..
     
  9. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    In answer to your original post, a candidate might be romance novels. The reason I say this (at least in the USA) it is a market that has not contracted, but expanded and fills many shelves in both the libraries and book stores.

    But, as was indicated above, skill, dedication, and drive are also needed. And if, for example, you pick romance, I am not sure it will be any less competative with respect to getting a novel (or novels) published.

    Terry
     
  10. Torana
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    Torana Contributing Member Contributor

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    I wouldn't suggest horror, there is a very small market for it...
     
  11. TragicJuliet
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    TragicJuliet Senior Member

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    would the small market make it harder or easier to get published? if it's small that means not many demand it meaning its gotta be pretty good for people to publish it right?
     
  12. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    Harder. If the market is smaller, there is less opportunity for large profits. Given that publishers are primarily business-minded people, they will act in the best interests of their business, that is, to seek the biggest profits. Since the market is small to begin with and opportunity for profit relatively lower (if that is indeed true, about the horror market being smaller) publishers will only want to publish work that they are absolutely sure will be successful for them. That means that they are less likely to take a risk on something that is maybe a little experimental or resistant to mainstream tastes, and therefore won't profit as highly. Obviously, great writing is their main criteria, but if the market is small, they'll only gamble with the most marketable books they can find.
     
  13. OrdinaryJoe
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    OrdinaryJoe Member

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    Just my own personal opinion, I don't think there is an easiest genre to write in. You either can tell a story or you can't. It's that simple. If you give a room full of people a story line and ask them to write it. Some would be able to spin a tale worth reading while others would not. I think people lock themselves into genre's. Oh that's Stephen king, he writes horror, or that's J.K. Rowling, she writes fantasy. Do you really think these people would not be unable to write a detective story? a romance? They have the most important skills to have, the ability to take an idea and transform it into a clearly and correctly written story. Don't try and kid yourself into thinking that any particular genre will be easier to write in. Just take the time to learn how to write. That way you open up all areas of story telling.
     
  14. Evelyanin
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    Evelyanin Senior Member

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    It really depends on who is writing. If you've never been in a relationship, romance may be more difficult. If you never read or watched horror, then you might not be able to write about it either. If you think fantasy is ridiculous, stay away from it. If Sherlock's thinking confuses you, you should avoid mystery. If you fall asleep while reading science fiction, you won't make it throught the first chapter of writing it. If historical fiction makes you yawn, even if it is the most popular genre of the year, you won't do well writing it.
    In the end, you need to write about something that interests you. The best thing you could do is start a story without worrying about the genre. I am still unclear as to the genre of my story, but if you have a story, then write about it. You shouldn't worry about what others think. You can't please everyone. Just write a good story and worry about everything else later. It is already difficult enough writing a story. Taking small bites is a lot easier than having to swallow both writing and publishing at the same time.
     

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