1. lessa
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    lessa Contributing Member

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    A food question for the British

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by lessa, Apr 2, 2009.

    I was reading a book and the character was talking about "drippy toast"
    what is that? It is driving me nuts.
    I know a lot of the strange names for dishes but that one is beyond me and
    all my cook books.
     
  2. LordKyleOfEarth
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    LordKyleOfEarth Contributing Member Contributor

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    Spotted dick is another British food item I don't get.
     
  3. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'm used to American food, but can someone tell me the difference between a 'hot biscuit' and a 'pancake'? I get the idea both of them are just what in Britain is a kind of thick pancake--and don't you have thin pancakes at all? (cookies = biscuits in the UK)...
     
  4. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'd imagine 'Drippy toast' was toast dipped in egg yolk, or eggy bread.

    Spotted Dick is just an old fashioned name, as matt said it's suet pudding with raisins and currents in - you eat it with custard. There's not alot to be confused by to be honest lol
     
  5. LordKyleOfEarth
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    LordKyleOfEarth Contributing Member Contributor

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    We ate some and were confused why people bother. It was dreadful.
     
  6. Dalouise
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    Dalouise Contributing Member

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    Probably means "dripping toast" a delicacy from my grandparents' day and a feature of anywhere north of the Watford Gap in the old days.
    Dripping is basically beef fat, that hard white stuff which is collected during or after cooking a joint of beef and allowed to get cold. You can still buy it in a lot of supermarkets. It was warmed up and toast dipped into it, so it was a bit runny or drippy although it hardened as it cooled.
    You youngsters have no idea what you've missed! ;)
     
  7. Gone Wishing
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    Gone Wishing Contributing Member

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    >_>

    I do.

    Occasionally, I think I was born a decade or two too late. I would have liked to grow up in the 60's-70's, and even used to be a little jealous of my mother (Led Zeppelin in concert for $2.50! I saw the old ticket stubb :eek:). Then I go to dinner at my grandma's house. One bowl of offal soup and jealousy fades as fast as my appetite, lol. :p
     
  8. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    They have very different consistencies, mainly due to biscuits having lard and pancakes not having lard. Biscuits tend to be crumbly, where pancakes have a firmer, more uniform texture. And pancakes in America are pretty thin, I would say, on average, a quarter of an inch thick (half an inch max.) I don't think the batter would allow for a much thicker one. Biscuits, on the other hand, can be quite robust in size since they use a dough, not a batter. We do have very thin pancakes, but we call the crepes.

    Biscuit (American) =

    [​IMG]

    Pancakes (American) =

    [​IMG]
     
  9. lessa
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    lessa Contributing Member

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    biscuits have the texture similar to scones.
    pancakes are just that cakes fried in a frying pan or on a griddle.

    I had the impression that drippy toast was french toast.
    And the author is definetly British. "Miss Read"
    I have read a lot of her books about village and school life and find
    her characters so real she must use people she knows to model them after.

    I think when my grandchildren come and I make french toast I will from now
    on call it drippy toast.
    Kids like things with funny names.
    thanks for answering.
     
  10. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    Thanks for clearing up the pancake/biscuit qn, Wrey! (Those pancakes still look very thick to me though. French crepes are wafer-thin. My parents live in Brittany, we live off crepes when we visit.) The biscuits look just like scones. Mmmm.
     

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