1. Sarah Everheart
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    Sarah Everheart New Member

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    a new world

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by Sarah Everheart, Mar 14, 2015.

    Is there any way you guys go about making a new world or fleshing one out? See I'm working on this story idea in which this guy is teleported from our world of normal boring ordinary to a fantasy element world. and where as I have a few ideas as for what happens there and some characters, I can't quite see the actual world itself yet. I have demi human and semi humans as lesser beings who people kick around and enslave, but just the world itself is still foggy to me.
     
  2. Commandante Lemming
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    Commandante Lemming Contributing Member Contributor

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    What DO you know about the world? Really basic stuff...are you seeing psuedo-greek mythological elements and quasi-roman centurions? I am just because you used the preface "demi-" and that makes me think of demigods. Are you in a more traditional medieval fantasy setting? I can't imagine you're seeing just black - so what are you seeing through the fog?

    If you are seeing just black - then you have the opportunity to have some real fun. If that's the case start looking at historical cultures and eras, find one that looks interesting or off beat, and fits your style, then expand it.

    And for what it's worth this is a good problem to have - a lot of people start with the world and then have trouble building a character based story. You're a step ahead of that crowd.
     
  3. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Really there is no 'right' or 'wrong' way to create a world. Some writers spend years creating a world, from cultures and lands and leaders, flora and fauna, and histories---and never actually write a story in that world.

    What will help you is to know the scope of the story. Is it local, or continent spanning? This will tell you what you need to develop. Creating a world it's good to have an outline or framework, but you don't need to fill in every detail (names of prominent people/gods/places/cultures, etc.) right off. But if you have the initial framework...ie: Island Nations...ie Hold of the Sea Princesses, are in a low grade war with the Pirate Guild and in negotiations...with Fredrick the Third's Kingdom that just endured a civil war (brother against brother monarch)...that may be enough. If the story takes place mainly in the Sea Princesses hold, you might need to know that they make their money hunting whales, and fishing...and would need to narrow down who some of the princesses who are in power are...at least by name...and as the character new to the world discovers...so would the reader, and you would flesh it out. And having that framework will provide consistency, so that you don't write yourself into an inconsistency or a corner.

    Take notes and jot ideas and keep them in a file.

    Also, what you do and how much in depth you plan might be determined if it's a stand alone story, or if it's intended to be a series. If it's a series, more planning and flexibility and note taking are in order...because readers will expect that consistency. And what you say and do and have happen in the first book can't be just randomly changed in the second...because it won't work--for the next book, or really the world in its expanded view, or you think this way is better, in retrospect.

    That's my two cents...worth...really broad answers for what's a broad and wide open question.

    Wishing you the best as you press forward!
     
  4. Chinspinner
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    Chinspinner Contributing Member Contributor

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    All I would say is that unless it is some dreamland or opium induced creation, it is best to make it consistent, i.e. it is governed by consistent physical and magical laws.
     
  5. Sarah Everheart
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    Sarah Everheart New Member

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    that's actually something I'm going for because with this fantasy world our worlds physics and sciences still apply to him however he's now in this magical world. The only main example I've come up with is he comes across an enchanted spear/sword in the ground. it's got the power of thunder, and a whole Excalibur thing going on. The thing is the weapon is just stabbed into the ground a little. by their rules only someone who's strength and will are indomitable can pull it. To us, the damn thing is pushed into the ground a little someone pull the thing out. so he can pull it out fine where as the rest of them are bound to the indomitable rule because they're part of their own universe.
     
  6. Aled James Taylor
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    Aled James Taylor Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'd think about what they don't have in that world and the repercussions of these absences. If they don't have electricity, lamp-oil and candles would be big business. If they don't have rule of law, personal security would be high on people's agendas and a significant proportion of able-bodied men would be employed as guards.
     
  7. Frankovitch
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    Frankovitch Member

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    First of all, think about themes. You could be looking at something completely unique, but most likely, you're thinking of something that in some sense mirrors some culture from our world. I wrote a short story some time ago, and while I didn't state it directly, the fact that the main character's name ended with -os, that he camped under an olive tree, and that the story focused around a bull-motif helmet still helped give a definite greek feel to the story. Which can work to your benefit. Otherwise you might have to describe every single thing, since each thing is something we can't relate to.

    After that, go for consistency and repercussions. These semi-humans, why are they considered lesser beings? Is there a historical reason for it? How do they feel about it, any rebellions in the works?

    If only the semi-humans do manual labor, it might be considered taboo for regular humans to engage in just that. How do the regular people feel about the semi-humans? Do some people sympathise with them, or are they considered evil and deserving of their fate?

    Considering the spear, if there are several of these powerful weapons around, where would they be found? Most likely in the hands of those already in power. As such, owning a magical weapon could be seen as proof of divinity. Getting your hands on one will definitely disrupt the local power balance as those in power try to either destroy your protagonist, or point him in the direction of their enemies.

    Any disorganised rebels would probably flock to a wielder of a magical weapon, eager to show the world that the divine claim these weapons have doesn't just support those in power.

    And so on, and so on.
     

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