1. SayWhatNow?
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    SayWhatNow? Senior Member

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    A Spider Web Plot?

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by SayWhatNow?, Oct 4, 2009.

    In my new short story turned in-progress novel, I am trying something that may or may not work.

    I am presenting three plots that apear to be seperate, but later tie in and create a single plot for the story that will be the basis for the next book (which I already have a rough idea for. This book is meant to a set-up for its sequel.)

    Is this a good way to write?
     
  2. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Your first book must stand alone. If that first book does not come together as one story, your chances oif getting published are next to nil.
     
  3. Phantasmal Reality
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    Phantasmal Reality Contributing Member

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    There's nothing wrong with setting up for a sequel, but like Cogito said, make sure that this story does not depend on that sequel. It would be pretty frustrating to read through a book only to discover "To be continued...." on the last page, where you were expecting to find some kind of resolution. XD
     
  4. ManhattanMss
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    ManhattanMss Contributing Member

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    Sounds pretty exciting, really. And besides that really good writers are ALWAYS "trying something that may or may not work." So, in that respect, I think you can consider yourself to be in awfully good company. Go for it!
     
  5. WMMorgan
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    WMMorgan Member

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    three plots

    Some well-known writers don't even worry about plot. Some can't write without a plot to start with. Every established writer will likely tell you something different about the how's and why's of plots.

    You want to write a book based on three plots, like three separate stories with interlaced chapters? I'm inclined to think that might confuse some readers. It might work for most readers, or at least some, if all of it is written well. But three plots or one won't make a difference if the writing is mediocre or worse.

    I think there was a movie from the 70s that followed numerous separate stories that weren't directly related with one another until the end, but I can't remember it. Woody Allen's Crimes and Misdemeanors--one of his best films--is similar that way too, as is The French Lieutenant's Woman.
     
  6. MumblingSage
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    MumblingSage Contributing Member

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    Cogito's right, but that doesn't mean you can't write it that way if you'd prefer to and if you're writing to please only yourself (or a group of friends you'll share the finished product with). If you do want to publish this book, though, you might have to reconsider, or get another book published first and then propose this series.
     
  7. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    there's nothing new about that approach, it's been done many times, with varying degrees of success...

    and btw, The French Lieutenant's Woman was a critically acclaimed novel, before it was made into a movie...
     
  8. tonten
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    tonten Senior Member

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    You could always do something like the TV show, Heroes.

    Like follow the eyes/stories of different characters; make them come together by chance; then wrap them all together at the end to show why they are tied to each other?



    I found Stephanie Meyer's first book to be plotless until the end. I guess it depends on what you are trying to portray and how you write it that makes your writing successful.
     
  9. HorusEye
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    HorusEye Contributing Member Contributor

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    Pulp Fiction does it pretty well.
     

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