1. S-wo
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    S-wo Active Member

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    A word for this

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by S-wo, Jan 29, 2009.

    I just now realized that I've been using a word that means something that I didn't intend. I was trying to describe a person who works at a train station and I called them a stationer or stationeer, which actually means a book publisher. I was wondering if someone hear knew of another word that I could use for I won't have to constantly say the guy who works at the train station, or another man who works for the train station approaches.
     
  2. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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  3. Gannon
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    Gannon Contributing Member Contributor

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    Depending on precisely what you do intend: driver, guard, conductor, brakeman, flagman, ticket collector, assistant conductor, on board service personnel
     
  4. S-wo
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    S-wo Active Member

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    Hmm, I guess yours would be closer Gannon in reference to the guard and ticket collector. What's a flagman?
     
  5. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    Flagmen were used before trains had radios. A flagman would "live" in the caboose at the end of the train and he would use flags in a semaphore-style communication with the engineers at the front of the train. For example, when backing up a train onto a side rail to pick up new cars, the flagman or a switchman would change the track switch setting and use flags to notify the engineer when it was safe to back up. Flagmen also lived in special areas like at the base of steep grades where they would use flags to warn up-slope train engineers to move onto a side rail because a fast moving down-slope train was approaching. Each switch also has a metal "flag" that indicates to an engineer which direction the switch is set.
     

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