1. soujiroseta
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    soujiroseta Senior Member Contributor

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    Action in my stories always ends up in a hollywood cliche

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by soujiroseta, Mar 13, 2008.

    i've been writing a crime based story which requires my main character to do some close quarters fighting with the bad guys. after writing a scene like this i always find that it sort of spins into a hollywood cliche which is not what im looking for. can anyone help me find a way to avoid this or is it just something which varies on the style of writing?
     
  2. (Mark)
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    (Mark) Contributing Member

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    Well, in real life, people can't take twenty punches or three gunshot wounds and then just shrug it off. Real violence is over as soon as it's begins, and doesn't feature epic, twenty minute fights between two people. Try and keep it realistic, and you'll be much better off.
     
  3. lordofhats
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    lordofhats Contributing Member

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    I agree with Connolly. First thing my sensei ever taught me in the dojo was as follows:

    Rules of Fighting:

    1. Most fights are over within ten seconds of starting.
    2. Never try anything fancy. Less is more. In most fights, simplicity is invaluable.
    3. Aim between the legs.

    The complex stuff you see in movies and games is nice to watch but wholy impractical in a real life situation. Most martial artist use boxing stances, even those who study Kung Fu or other fancy martial arts styles when In a real fight. Its simply the most effecient stance for a street fight.

    Also: Sensei always say. If possible, retreat.
     
  4. soujiroseta
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    soujiroseta Senior Member Contributor

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    i understand all of the above but i man the wording always seems too much or too weird, i dunno. i once read an ian fleming james bond book where 007 is precariously dangling from an edge and even though it might seem trivial it was well orchestrated. do you guys have any advice on how to make the fights real, even though they will be very short?
     
  5. Cheeno
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    Cheeno Contributing Member

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    Depends on the expertise of your character. If he/she has sufficient knowledge to disarm or disable without getting bogged down with the complications that interactive violence brings, then you can finish things in moments. Often, it's the 'lead up' to the event that provides the necessary tension. Vulnerability is also a good trait for a character to have, so it isn't always the right thing for your character to 'succeed' immediately. Like in film or theatre, the action needs to be choreographed in detail. Maybe it'll help if you 'sketch it' on paper?
     
  6. soujiroseta
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    soujiroseta Senior Member Contributor

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    i think youre right cheeno, the anticipation and vulnerability are key factors. thank you:)
     

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