1. Mrt
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    Mrt New Member

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    Adding Graphs and mine maps to a story

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Mrt, Oct 27, 2010.

    I am about to start writing a book , i used to write detail quotes using graphs and graphics to win contracts so i am a very visual person when it come down to the way i write. Of course the book i will be working on is technical but i would like to add some Graphics to help project my point and direction so that anybody can understand. Is this uncommon in a fictional books ? Is there pros and cons approaching a publisher sending in your novel with graphics. I did read someplace that your photos and graphics should not be incorporated in the the story , the publisher will have to work with there format and insert the photos there way.
    Thanks
     
  2. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I think it would be harder to tell you stories, and that the approach have some pitfalls. But I also think i could have some interesting opportunities, as long as the graphs was used as a part of the fiction, not as a mean to explain the fiction when words fail you.

    I think the right approach would be to master writing stories without any need for graphs, and then once you done that go back to your interest in graphs and experiment with incorporating them.
     
  3. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    If you can write a story without using them, then you shouldn't insert them after. They should only be used (if at all) when there is no other way to illustrate the point they make.
     
  4. w176
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    w176 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Oh. I meant a different story. You should learn to tell stories first, and then after you learned what it takes to tell a story you can begin writing stories experimenting with the story format.
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    you should not send in unrequested graphics with an adult novel ms, period!... and your story shouldn't have to have them included to make good sense to the reader...

    if you want to include some, then after a contract is offered is the time to bring it up, so it can be made clear who's to provide the artwork...

    till then, imo it would be amateurish t'the max, to make illustrations part of a novel ms...
     
  6. Mrt
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    Mrt New Member

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    Well a mistake on my Part i don't know if this would change any opinions because i jump to the the conclusion that i would be writing a novel and in fact it is not it would simply be a book or if there is another category.

    Lets say hypothetically i was going to write a book on lets say how we can travel again to the moon and sustain living there and i am going to show how the current NASA structure works and make my own conclusion how to fix it buy showing mined maps the they way it exists in the present and where to make modifications to the structure to achieve these goals. It is fictional and some people might think that some ideas are radical.

    Right now i am scratching my head. what is the classification.

    What i want to write about is something is coming but the way it is now and not done properly we could be heading for a disaster.

    SO what would the classification Be ?

    Thanks
     
  7. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    It's non-fiction. So graphs and mindmaps may be appropriate/necessary.
     
  8. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    Graphics in fiction (other than children's) used to be virtually unknown. They're starting to appear, probably because technology has made them easier, but they're still rare. Where they do appear they usually seem to be integral to the story, such as a picture of some artefact that is difficult to interpret (and, of course, a map of the land at the beginning of a fantasy story is commonplace; I suppose the family tree at the beginning of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo is a non-fantasy equivalent). That's a long way from using them to "help project [your] point and direction so that anybody can understand". That seems to be using your graphics to tell your story, which would put your work firmly in the "experimental" genre, which is a very small niche.

    What I'm really worried about is that you have to ask "Is this uncommon in a fictional books [sic]". If you don't know what is common or uncommon in fiction then I think you need to do a lot more critical reading before getting down to a major piece of writing.
     
  9. Mrt
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    Mrt New Member

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    I new i came to the right place thanks for the great input :)

    As we are on this discussion i have been doing more research and there is a ways to go .

    There seems to be a new trend in the e books that allows video clips graphics photos to enhance the readers experience. The modifications are done by the publisher, this is probably to prepare for the next generation that need these enhancement to keep there attention.

    Here is a great link , this is a speaker but by the use of animation really brings out the point i don't want to get off the subject here but take a look this it is really something.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A3oIiH7BLmg&feature=channel
     
  10. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i'm sorry to have to mention this, mrt, but it's clear from your posts that in addition to doing the requisite research, you also need to significantly improve your grammar and spelling, before you'll be ready to turn out writing that is up to the minimum standards for publishing...
     
  11. Mrt
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    Mrt New Member

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    yes i agree but if i put a lot of work into the book then i would look at hiring a ghost writer to clean it up, i just so happen to know one. my objective is also self improvement.;)
     
  12. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    hiring a ghost writer to 'clean up' your ms is almost guaranteed to be a waste of money, since a first novel by an unknown writer has little to no chance of being published and even if it is, it's not likely to make you enough money to cover what you've spent...

    good ghostwriters cost in the thousands of dollars and even the best can't guarantee the book will ever be accepted by a paying publisher...

    if you want to be a writer, you'll have to rely on your own skills, not on someone you pay to make your writing readable/publishable...
     

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