1. HondaWriter
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    HondaWriter Member

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    Anyone else suffer from depression?

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by HondaWriter, Nov 5, 2009.

    I dont know if I have depression or not, never been diagnosed, but I'll be going to a doctor soon to get checked out. I get a solid three week lull every couple of months. For the most part, I function through it. Im still creative as far as writing goes but just dont feel like going on with the little everyday things.

    Im just paranoid a doctor will want to throw meds down my throat, so I've put going to see a doctor off.

    Anyone else go through this? Just curious on what you've found that helps.
     
  2. NaCl
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    NaCl Contributing Member Contributor

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    I experience severe depressions on a regular basis but I avoid doctors precisely for the reason you mentioned. I am not interested in taking mood altering drugs. In fact, I have found that my most creative moments are often deep within the depressed period. If the depressions became debilitating, I would seek treatment, but I actually find them pleasurable...I withdraw from human contact and spend lots of time writing.
     
  3. madhoca
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    madhoca Contributing Member Contributor

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    Sorry to hear about your problem Honda. I think you're doing the right thing by going to a doctor. You know, sometimes depression can be related to a physical illness so the meds you get may be necessary to rectify this, and not the type of meds you're worried about. I have depressions from time to time but I know they are related to the stuff I have to deal with and can't fix. I found distance running helped a lot. Funny, I couldn't write when I was bad, or rather everything turned out too depressing or emo but I'm glad to hear you can still write when you're down.
    Good luck and treasure yourself a bit, won't you?
     
  4. Lmc71775
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    Lmc71775 Active Member

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    I'm bipolar (manic-depressive) and I know what you're going through. You're lucky it doesn't effect your creativity too much. I seem to have that problem alot. When I'm depressed, I can't seem to motivate myself to do anything.

    It's good to hear you're going to the doctor. Don't be afraid about it. They are there to help you. Good luck to you.
     
  5. Mercurial
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    Mercurial Contributing Member Contributor

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    Depressive disorders are diagnosed in approximately 18.8 million Americans --diagnosed. I would be surprised if a good percentage of users here werent on medication.

    As for a doctor shoving pills down your throat... it depends on the doctor. If you go to your general practitioner, he probably will because he doesnt have the time or qualifications to counsel you. A psychiatrist on the other hand is more likely to offer therapy sessions, although they are MDs and can prescribe medicine. Psychologists and therapists can only provide therapy without medication. Some psychiatrists work with psychologists / therapists. In my opinion, the specialized team is often more beneficial to the patient... but it's usually more costly as well.

    Mental disorders are tricky because the degree of the problem is sometimes hard to diagnose in the first few sessions, but if you dont diagnose it right away, a patient may do something irrational. If you really dont want to be medicated, go to a psychologist or therapist; verbal discussions are what they're trained to do, whereas psychiatrists would probably do a combination of both.

    All the same, I stress that you shouldnt be scared of medicine. For most depressive disorders, it's hard to reverse that sort of negative cycle without some sort of medication because in most cases it's a chemical imbalance. Once you learn proper coping skills and can battle and defeat the low serotonin and endorphine levels, a person prone to depression can exist without it, but it would be difficult to do on your own --like quitting smoking. A negative feedback cycle is hard to break and is ingrained into a person's lifestyle oftentimes.
     
  6. Robert Lipscombe
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    Robert Lipscombe Member

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    exercise generally helps... of course if you can weather it, that's probably the best thing, but if it gets too much you really should get some help to lift the mood a bit... life is tough and there are plenty of reasons for sadness, but sometimes there seems to be no action you can possibly take and just keeping on going seems pointless - it's at times like that it is a good idea to have a bit of help from chemistry..
    big hug and very best wishes
    RL
     
  7. StrangerWithNoName
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    StrangerWithNoName Longobard duke

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    I'm depressed too, nothign too serious, I can easily mask it in real life, and that's useful, because if they find that you're depressed, they're gonna avoid any contact with you. It seems that most people think that depression is somehow contagious, and I consider this the worst aspect of this problem.

    How it affects writing? In my case it's the opposite, my writing isn't going the way I want it to go and this makes me feel depressed.
     
  8. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    ^ Seconded. Same thing here.

    But on top of that, I become terribly depressed and angry when it's my lady-time. It's gotten uncontrollable. I get violent and abusive now, and I'm at my worst at times like this. The ridiculous 'S' word starts popping up and I have to have an internal discussion with myself as to whether I even belong on this planet or not. It's a moment of madness, but I deal with it and wait til it goes.

    That's the only thing I'd be willing to take medication for, simply because I know it's a chemical inbalance to do with my periods, and so far it's done nothing but get progressively worse.

    But as for my down-time, I'm not interested in taking pills for the rest of my life just to change it. I've lived with it for as long as I can remember and I think i'm going to have to accept it.
    Oh, and I don't want councilling either - I just don't. Simple as.

    I'm like a toddler - I just have to wait until I burn myself out. Spend a lot of time alone, sleeping and eating comfort food. It's not an ideal solution - but it'll do.
     
  9. StrangerWithNoName
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    StrangerWithNoName Longobard duke

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    I think that the Opner should rework the title of the thread.

    "is there anybody here who isn't depressed?"
     
  10. Carmina
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    Carmina Contributing Member Contributor

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    There is depression as in a mood or state of mind. then there is depression the actual disorder. I have had issues with depression in the clinical sense, although my more pressing mental health concerns are more in the area of anxiety disorders. After I attempted suicide at 14 and went into therapy...we opted against drugs. With time and counseling, I got a lot better and learned how to handle things. I opted to take meds in college when depression and OCD were interfering in my ability to funtcion. I did behavior modification therapy and learned how to cope without meds. Then I had a nervous breakdown in 2006 and have been on meds ever since. I do much better overall on them. Tried going off in December...let's just say people noticed. As for whether or not a doctor will push drugs..there are different treatment plans. Different ones might be appropriate at different stages for you. NO meds...meds while doing therapy until you don't need them, or long term maintenance. That is all stuff to go over with your doctor. Also...finding the right doctor is a challenge. Don't be discouraged if you don't click with the first one.
     
  11. HorusEye
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    HorusEye Contributing Member Contributor

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    I had some years with depression, or a depression-like state at least. Mainly it made me feel alienated from the world and prefer solitude. Now, looking back, I think I was just with the wrong crowds, work-wise and such. People I had nothing in common with and never would have. That can have the effect of making you feel at odds with the world.

    Knowing that there are people out there who share your understanding of life is a huge help. If I were to offer any advice to my past self, it would have been to go out in the world more.
     
  12. wishyoucould
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    yes i have depression as well sometimes it will get so bad that im starting to think its something more. i am currently seeing a counselor and will (maybe) start on meds this december...grr..
     
  13. Eoz Eanj
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    Eoz Eanj Contributing Member Contributor

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    In my experience, depression is as great as the problems it causes. There's nothing wrong with having the occasional day where you'd just rather withdraw from society and feel 'sad', but when depression begins to affect your ability to function harmoniously in everyday life, then you have a problem that needs to be examined more closely.

    Depression has many layers, from the superficial initial layers of feeling blue (and consequentially), a bit withdrawn; to the inner, more complex layers, whereby your depression causes you to become physically ill and you begin to lose control of your emotions and behaviour without even being provoked.
    Often, depression may not even be the cause of how you're feeling; depression has a high co-morbidity with many different mental afflictions, such as bipolar and anxiety disorders, and also physiological problems, like an ill-functioning thyroid, vitamin/mineral deficiency, or an electrolyte/hormonal imbalance.

    What I'm trying to get at here is that, and this goes for ANYONE experiencing a problem with their mental health, is that you need to undergo a proper, physical and psychological evaluation by a doctor, before concluding that you suffer a specific problem, and how much control over that problem, you do and do not have.

    If you're worried about how accurate a single doctor's evaluation is, go see another one and ask for a second opinion.
    Seriously, it is not wise to just to sit back and let your psychological problems simmer at the brim, thinking that it's something you must accept as a part of you; they'll either manifest into something more severe, or you'll experience a rather hasty mental breakdown (I've seen it happen).

    I have awful anxiety problems and for ages I never wanted to take control over them. I'd have moments following a panic attack and think, 'I guess this is just how I am.. I've lived with it this long, I guess I'll have to accept it as an inevitable part of my identity'.. Man, how this notion resonated within me when I first got up the courage to seek help... I suddenly realised that I don't have to live in paralysing fear every day of my life. It may be a part of my identity, but it is a part that I have control over.

    Also, psych. medications have received a fairly harsh wrap in my opinion, especially by people who've never used them. In the beginning I avoided using any psych. medications, I did not like the notion at all... but I'm so glad I gave them a go. I have such a higher quality of life than I did before, and this quality is only improving as I adopt a healthier way of living.

    Anyway, apologies for the ramble, I guess this is just a topic I feel strongly about. Haha.
     
  14. ChimmyBear
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    ChimmyBear Contributing Member Contributor

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    I was reading over all of the former posts and I am surprised that so many people suffer with depression and other mental health concerns. As for me, I think our mental health is as important as our physical health. I will tell my story this time and I most likely wont bring it up again in the public threads. I have talked one on one with a few of you guys about it. I am not one to allow it to define who I am, I have depression, it doesn't have me.

    When I was 26, my sever depression, anxiety, and panic disorders came to a head. I was experiencing phantom pain and I couldn't get out of bed, drive, talk on the phone, or even deal with a grocery list. The simple things we so often take for granted had become overwhelming mountains. Somewhere in the middle of all this I began to think of suicide as my only way out. I had attempted it when I was 15 and then again at 16. The idea wasn't frightening to me. My head was a mess.
    I was admitted into the hospital for abdominal pain and after three days of finding nothing, my doctor came into my room, and gently said, "My dear, you have a choice, you can either get help for your depression or I am going to admit you into a mental health facility for up to 60 days." I chose to go to the Psychologist he recommended. It was the best thing for me, honestly, it was the best decision "by force" that I have ever made. Through it all I have learned what triggers my emotional episodes, I discovered that I have a chemical imbalance which causes my highs and lows...yes, I am sure you guys have noticed how I can be sooooo happy one day and then I am completely down the next. The most important thing I have learned about this condition, I will never be "well", it is ever a part of who I am. I can do things to help with the symptoms, like go out for a walk when I want to stay in. I journal down my feelings when I am overwhelmed with something big. Exercise helps as well as meditation. I have to stay on top of what's going on in my head or it will get away from me.

    Finding the right doctor can make all of the difference in the world. My therapy was completed without the help of drugs, she chose not to give me the prescriptions the Psychiatrist had prescribed because of my dependence risk as well as my risk of suicide. I am not going to kid you, it was very difficult to work through. I mean when you can't drive or even handle your business over the phone, to go against the grain is hard to over come. But I did get through it, though sometimes that ugly monster tries to rear it's head. I take it day by day, knowing that I have family and friends who love me and will help me through those hard times.
     
  15. Irish87
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    Irish87 Contributing Member

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    There is nothing more depressing than being around depressed people who meander around with perpetual grimaces and never quite accept the compliments that you give them. Strangely enough, when I find myself depressed for whatever reason I have the same toxic response to overly happy folk who haven't any room in their cheery little sunshine life for those who are human and react to situations differently than a nervous smile and plenty of bourbon. I think what I am trying to say is that I get depressed from time to time and at times I am absurdly happy for little reason. I do believe they call that being human, but maybe I am horribly wrong.

    I've always hated doctors, though. They're experts so you feel as though you have to trust what they say. Instead, I like to find my own happiness and know that I am self reliant. I don't need a pill or a doctor or a friend or my dog or my bike or anything else to make myself happy, I can do it all by myself if I want. And since I am able to do that I surround myself with dozens of individuals and enjoy the fruits of self reliance.

    Mind you, I am able to do all of that because I most likely don't have any mental disorders other than a strange bit of anxiety I catch every now and again. Anyone who finds themselves in a state of constant depression that cannot be willingly lifted should probably go and see a doctor of some sort. That's not to say you have to believe that doctor, but it's always good to be safe when it comes to mental health. Then again, if you're a writer it's probably a good thing if you have a nice little gaggle of mental disorders to play around with. Hell, look at the Marquis de Sade... alright, bad example.

    Nothing quite says good literature like lunacy.

    Good luck either way :)
     
  16. tarnished
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    tarnished Contributing Member Contributor

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    I used to be.

    And now I work out all the time and have lots more friends.
    So not really anymore.

    And my writing sucks now.
     
  17. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    I used to be really depressed as a teenager...probably not clinically depressed, just really withdrawn, angry, sad. I think a lot of my recovery had to do with rejecting the idea of "self-esteem"...I think there's this mythologising of happiness that says it is purely internal, that it comes from inside and that its just a choice to be happy. I guess that must work for some people, thinking about happiness that way, but it didn't for me. Instead, I came to consider happiness as something that is produced externally, and something that is always relative. I'm not a self-regenerative well of happiness.
     
  18. Vapor
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    Vapor Member

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    The term is bandied about so much that it's hard to know what anyone means when they say "depression". Doctors are not infallible either. Some people have good experiences taking meds but I would like to warn that for some it is a horrible experience with terrible consequences (I love how increased risk of suicide is labeled a "side effect"). If something feels wrong then don't do it, no matter how much doctors and family tell you you are sick and can only be cured by taking meds for your "chemical imbalance". I would say exhaust all options within your control first, like clean diet, exercise, adequate rest and social activities. Then, see a priest or a therapist and only as a last resort let them flood your brain with drugs.
     
  19. Eoz Eanj
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    Eoz Eanj Contributing Member Contributor

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    Doctors don't 'flood' your brain with drugs (responsible doctors that is). Farrout, over-reaction much? This is why I was so hesistant to take medication, because of its bad (overkill) reputation. I take an extremely low dose of medication, and it has done wonders for myself. Yes, there were side effects for the first three weeks I took it, but they were far from anything severe. Although, with this said, I do agree that other non-drug therapies are required in order for a long-term intervention to be effective. Also, to add, sometimes medication just happens to be the facet that is most significant factor in the effectiveness of an intervention (such as in my case).
     
  20. Speedy
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    Speedy Contributing Member Contributor

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    Saw a doctor just over month ago, found out I have Bi-Polar, type two (not primary because I have no voices talking too me). Was put on a few meds and 15 free counselling sessions free thanks to Medicare

    Talking is better than meds in most cases, but talking couldn’t help me fracture two fingers and smash up my laptop and a handful of other items, so I’m pretty much stuck on them 9though I still talk). 4 weeks later I’m feeling something I have hardly ever felt. Human.

    If you know a good doctor see them, if not ask round, some doctors WILL just put you on meds without spending time to find out what’s up. I spent 45 minutes with my doctor when I first went in.

    One will do what one must.

    Do some research, there are also lots of local events for people who are depressed, or think they are. People get together and just talk, or listen. Maybe if you live in or near a decent sized town you can ring up community centres.
     
  21. elephantmango
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    elephantmango New Member

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    Occasionally

    Not that much, but when something really bad happens my depression can last for a lot longer than normal, especially if someone has died. I'm surprised I was never diagnosed with minor autism, because I can form unnatural connections to certain things.
     
  22. Vapor
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    Vapor Member

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    Good for you that you had a good experience, but in this thread at least the negative side is quite underrepresented. My experience on them was sheer hell, and it pains me to read countless stories online of people being prescribed huge cocktails, with drugs continually added to deal with side effect complaints. I don't see what "bad overkill" reputation you are talking about; every night on the network news there are drug commercials for depression. Also the majority of doctors I've seen, with all their authority of knowledge (hence feel trustworthy), totally downplay the possible bad effects and speak of it like a benign thing. People *should* be hesitant that a drug is going to have just a specific, desirable effect on a system as complex as emotion and cognition.
     
  23. Speedy
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    Speedy Contributing Member Contributor

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    Well i was thinking suicidal thoughts myself, and well the side effect to that could have been death. maybe not, but its not a fun game.

    I'm not pro drugs at all, but it depends what level of depression your on.(and this is where so many doctors fail)

    For me real dwepression is something thats with you, not something that comes and goes when life throws you a curve ball and gores away in a few wr=orking days.

    People who get depressed through such means as thngs like a death, bad grades, lack of sleep etc etc should be seeking other means than pills anyway IMO.


    THOUGH i must say i was given a few under the counter sleeping pills to help me, which im still not truly sure why. I took one and slep 33 hours straight (was half a pill and i was given 3), just for a quick reboot i think, but i wasent pleased about that (sorry rambling)
     
  24. Eoz Eanj
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    Eoz Eanj Contributing Member Contributor

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    You misunderstand. I'm saying the negative side effects of psych medications are over-represented in this thread, (and, arugably, in other mediums of the media). Yes, I believe the majority of doctors do not evaluate their patients properly and therefore put them on medication that they don't actually need to be on, and also prescribe medication as a 'quick' fix for their patients problems; the bandaid solution as one would say. It's not neccessarily all the doctors fault (although, I do believe some are just plain irresponsible), as the majority of them do have good intentions, but either do not have the resources or energy to conduct a thorough examination of their patients (at least in Australia that is, our health system is falling apart), or , are prescribing medication with uterior motives, such as through financial benefit on behalf of drug companies. I'm certainly not ignorant as to the controversy behind the use of psych. medications, all I'm trying to say is that it's a very good idea to recieve a proper medical examination before one abandons the notion of using psych. medication completely. I think you'll find that sure, the majority of those whom report being affected by depression, are not so severely affected by it that they need to resort to medication to help restore their neurochemical function, but rather, need simply to make alterations to their lifestyle and cognitive practices (ode to the power of positive thought, for one).. but sometimes, in the minority of cases (such as myself).. medication is actually worth a shot, and can (actually) yield profoundly positive results. Oh, and another thing, I believe it's a misconception that once someone begins taking a medication, that they're stuck with it for the rest of their lives.. yeah, not true. Sometimes, in extremely severe cases, the person in question does need to be on medication.. but in others, once the person feels as if they're psychologically recovered, then so begins the process of removing medication from their lifestyle.

    Anyway, you get the picture, sorry for dribbling on.
     
  25. Vapor
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    Vapor Member

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    Well I'm glad they helped you and I'm certainly not saying no one should ever use them. I just think it should be the very last thing a person tries after less invasive means of combating depression (or anxiety, ADD etc). It just frustrates me the prevalence of prescriptions these days. As Mercurial said, it's more unusual now to meet someone who's NOT been on some kind of psych med than one who has. When I was facing a very hard time in my life no one told me that the meds might be harmful; doctors, counselors and family all tried to assure me despite my misgivings. It was a big mistake for me to ever take those meds, so I wish I'd had someone who gave me a "farrout over-reaction" as to their danger, because in my case it would not have been an exaggeration.
     

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