1. gorweave
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    gorweave New Member

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    'at about,' 'at around' - a form of redundancy?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by gorweave, Jun 30, 2010.

    Is it permissible to use the word 'at' before the words 'about' or 'around' and be technically correct?

    See examples below:

    On June 6, 2010, at about 10 p.m., the police arrested John Doe for DUI.
    On June 6, 2010, at around 10 p.m., the police arrested John Doe for DUI.

    Or should it be:

    On June 6, 2010, about 10 p.m., the police arrested John Doe for DUI.
    On June 6, 2010, around 10 p.m., the police arrested John Doe for DUI.

    I'm told that either something occurs at a certain time or about/around a certain time. Something does not happen at around or at about a certain time. Is this correct?

    Is using at about or at around a form of redundancy and therefore incorrect? Please help.

    Thank you in advance for your help. :)
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    in creative writing, i'd say it's more a matter of style, than fixed rules 'n regs... whether you use one or the other would depend on what it is you're writing and the 'voice' you're writing in...
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    In the first context, with the at, around or about are not being used as prepositions. They are being used as adverbs, synonymous with approximately.

    If you remove the at, then around or about act as the preposition instead, even though the overall meaning of thw phrase is the same.

    Which merely expands upon what Maia said. :)
     

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