1. MainerMikeBrown
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    MainerMikeBrown Contributing Member

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    Be Realistic When Trying To Make A Difference

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by MainerMikeBrown, Sep 15, 2013.

    Many individuals have good intentions, as they want to help people and make a difference in the lives of others. For example, some people want to help those who have issues with mental illness.

    However, while it's a positive thing to want to help others suffering from depression, PTSD, and other forms of mental illness, I must stress to everyone to be realistic when trying to help those with this terrible illness.

    Some individuals who want to help others have unrealistic goals. They think they're going to go out and save the world. Then they try helping those with mental illness for a while and they get a reality check.

    Don't get me wrong, there are people you can help. But then their are others you simply can't help.

    So when trying to make a difference in the lives of those with mental health issues, be realistic. If you have unrealistic goals, you run the risk of getting burned out trying to help others.
     
  2. Aled James Taylor
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    Aled James Taylor Contributing Member Contributor

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    The initial statements do seem a little mixed up. Essentially the theme of the piece is unrealistic expectations. I think it would be good to include this in the first sentence.
    You use the term 'want to help' several times. More variety in the terms used would help.
    Some readers will be unfamiliar with the abbreviation 'PTSD'. I think this should be written out if full.
    You use the term 'this terrible illness' as if referring to only one but you've just listed several. Perhaps the term 'this type of condition' would fit better.
    Try to avoid using the word 'get' (unless it's in dialog).
    Generally, I think greater vocabulary would help. Try to avoid using the same words and expressions more than necessary.
    This may benefit from a specific example of an unrealistic goal and the reality that would counter it.
    On the whole, you make your point concisely and clearly.
     
  3. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    @Aled James Taylor: Lounge section is not a place for critique. I imagine OP was simply wanting to start a discussion,rather than asking for feedback on his writing. If, however the OP was looking for the critique, then the thread needs to be moved.
     
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  4. Aled James Taylor
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    Aled James Taylor Contributing Member Contributor

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    Sorry, I'm still new here and made a mistake. I just assumed this was a piece of writing to be reviewed since the subject matter was not related to writing.
    It might be a good idea to include something in the rules to indicate what the Lounge is for.
     
  5. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    It really isn't a problem, I saw you were new and I just wanted to let you know :) I think the rules and descriptions of the Lounge are quite clear, but maybe something changed since the site was updated recently. In any case, the Writing Workshop is the only place where critiques take place, and that section has clear rules of posting (minimum 2 weeks of membership and for every post of own work, we need to critique two others etc).
     
  6. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    I agree. Helping others, regardless of the problem, is a tricky thing. It can be difficult to strike the right balance between being disinterested or shy about it, and being overbearing. In my experience, we can only help those who want to be helped. Also, insecurity regarding how to go about helping someone who is struggling, can leave a lot of people who need help feeling alone and like nobody cares. It's best to listen, more than anything. That way, we can find out what is it we can do to help, and also, often, just being there and listening, and being supportive, goes a long way.
     
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  7. zabaar
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    zabaar Member

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    This is what i've been going through for the past few years. As a child i've always been an idealist, believing i was born to do great things and thought myself to be a great hero who would solve worldly problems. I set high expectations for myself and as the saying goes - the higher the expectations, the greater the fall and felt burned out in the process.

    Of course, I've learnt to be wiser and more realistic, though sometimes i still tend to be overly ambitious.

    A good number of people in the social services sector have reported burn outs too. I guess they get overly involved with their client's plights and put themselves under amounts of responsibility that eventually wear them out.
     
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