1. Dirtrackfan3DH
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    Dirtrackfan3DH Member

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    Beginner Advice

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Dirtrackfan3DH, Oct 26, 2015.

    Looking for any advice for a beginning writer. I wrote paper for my English class in high school..graduated in 2012. Now I'm thinking about writing about dirt track racing in a fictional format. Any and all advice is appreciated! Thanks in Advance!
     
  2. aguywhotypes
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    aguywhotypes Active Member

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    That's all you need. Start writing
     
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  3. Imaginarily
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    Imaginarily Disparu en Mer Contributor

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    I suspect you're looking for specific instructions, eg, "Do exactly this," and "Don't ever do that."

    Sorry to say, those rules don't exist. Aside from spelling and grammar, there are no rules.

    If you're anything like me, you're writing because you want to. You enjoy the process, you have a story to tell. Embrace that. Don't you ever fall out of love with storytelling, you hear me? :bigeek:

    *ahem*

    This topic (many have been asking questions about "the right way to write" lately) is rapidly turning me into a broken record.

    Write what makes you happy. Write whatever you want, however you want. There are no rules for genre, voice, style, level of detail, or anything like that.

    Just do your thing. :write:
     
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  4. Dirtrackfan3DH
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    Dirtrackfan3DH Member

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    Thank you.. I guess I have been watching a tv show where a kid writes and gets published Yada Yada Yada more less what got me intrigued to start writing is that I enjoyed it in high school and I enjoy certain topics like dirt track racing so I figured I'd write about a dirt track racer and his season and I guess that's what I'm starting with..see how that goes..hardest part will be thinking of a title for it
     
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  5. Imaginarily
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    Imaginarily Disparu en Mer Contributor

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    o_O

    Okay lesson number one: Punctuation.
     
  6. Dirtrackfan3DH
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    Dirtrackfan3DH Member

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    Ya, I'll work on that.
     
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  7. tonguetied
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    tonguetied Contributing Member Contributor

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    Don't worry about the title at this point, something you write in your story might jump out as being the title for your book once you have it put together. BTW, I believe titles are not copyrighted, so you don't have to worry about it being unique, but it is usually best to try for that. Finally if the title is truly the hardest part for your writing effort then you have something over 99% of the rest of the forum members I believe.
     
  8. Dirtrackfan3DH
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    Dirtrackfan3DH Member

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    Ya I should have worded that better.. the title for me is part of the hard part but also a big part is that I have an idea how I want to start but I have to write down what I'm thinking and see if the words start flowing after that and also gotta think of character names
     
  9. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    Don't overthink it. That's my problem, I overthink it first before I write it.

    Just make up some names. If your characters have to be called Howard, Nora, Shaun, or Preston until better names come up for them, then so be it. Just write with your heart first. The thinking can come later once you're done.
     
  10. Shbooblie
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    Shbooblie Contributing Member

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    I'm pretty new at this too @Dirtrackfan3DH . The best thing I've found is just to write. What comes out might be a bit rough or even downright bad but that's what 2nd, 3rd, 4th drafts are there for.
    As long as you can get what's in your head out of there and on to paper or a computer screen you're not going wrong.

    Leave the title for now, you'll get that from the vibes your book gives out when you've got more pieces put together. Like @Link the Writer said, names can always be changed. I know my characters have had several different names before I settled on the ones they have now. You just know if it fits or not, if it doesn't just change them until it does.

    Must mention too the guys on here are all so helpful so you're definitely in the right place for support. Good Luck!
     
  11. Dirtrackfan3DH
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    Dirtrackfan3DH Member

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    Thanks everybody for the help. We will see where my writing takes me once I finally start lol
     
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  12. davidov
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    davidov Member

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    Not sure I agree with all the "just write it" advice. I've been looking around a number of writing forums and there's a deluge of bad writing going on that's really just a waste of everybody's time. Clearly there are a few cardinal sins to avoid that will improve your writing no end. The big three for me are:
    - be sparing with adjectives
    - avoid lyricism and over-earnestness (especially avoid exclamation marks and over-helpful words like "very")
    - avoid flat explanations (work it into the narrative instead).
     
  13. Tenderiser
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    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Contributor

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    I agree with 'just write'. The biggest stumbling block for new writers is worrying so much about whether you're doing it right or wrong that you never actually get round to telling the damn story. Editing is the bit you can learn or at least pay someone else to do for you. Churning the story out is the bit you need to do.
     
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  14. xanadu
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    xanadu Contributing Member Contributor

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    While ultimately I agree, these are the things that really seem to come with time and experience. Trying to instill rules in a new writer, especially without copious examples and context, can send that writer down the wrong path. I remember when I was a new writer and tried, with every sentence I wrote, to follow every rule tossed around on the forum. It was impossible. It took me a very long time to get comfortable enough just to write through the work without caring about rules. It took even more practice to fully grasp what the rules meant (not just what they said).

    I'm a little wary of the advice to just write whatever you want, no hold barred. But for beginners, I really do think that's likely the best approach. Learn the rules as you go. Post pieces for critique and have them picked apart precisely so you can see those rules and examples applied to your own writing. It's not like your early writing is going to be masterful anyway. Hell, my first novel is essentially beyond salvation. But that's fine, because I know why and I know how to avoid doing it again.

    So write. Get a feel for it. Get some idea of what it takes to see a piece through to the end. Then have others look it over. Let it get picked apart. Gain an understanding of what might be wrong with it, what might not be wrong with it, and the reasons why. Then use that to drum up the motivation to write some more. And on it goes.
     
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  15. Imaginarily
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    Imaginarily Disparu en Mer Contributor

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    As Neil deGrasse Tyson once said (paraphrased), the biggest problem in our society today is that as soon as our kids learn to walk and talk, we spend the rest of their lives telling them to sit down and shut up.

    Never stifle creativity. Don't do it. Let that person explore and find their voice.
     

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