1. KatieValino
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    KatieValino Member

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    Beta Reader Available

    Discussion in 'The Art of Critique' started by KatieValino, Jun 28, 2014.

    Hey there guys and gals. Some of you may remember me, some of you not so much. I am Kate and I am currently a student/full time care worker on the cusp of graduating. I have some spare time this summer due to not having to study for the first time in ages. I do not like having nothing to do and since I have met some wonderful people on here who do the same for me, I would very much like to offer up my services as a beta reader. I am going to be taking an MA in editing and publishing as of 2016 so this will all be good practice for when I do, not to mention beneficial for the writer too.
    I make no claims of being an expert, merely a long time reader and helpful person who enjoys helping people with their creative outlets. I know what works in books and what doesn't (as an amateur) and I would very much love to be of service.
     
  2. Catrin Lewis
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    Catrin Lewis Contributing Member Contributor

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    Hi, Kate, pleased to make your virtual acquaintance.

    Beta readers are good people to have around and your offer is a generous one. What I would want to know first off (speaking only for myself, you understand) is what genres you're most amenable to and how you approach critique in general. You've given some crits in the Workshop, or you wouldn't be a full member. But I haven't been able to see them, for how to home in on any member's critical input, yours included, is outside my scope of knowledge.

    I did find and read the thread you started concerning your own struggles to find committed beta readers. How important it is, do you think, that the beta should be into the genre you write? I, for instance, write contemporary realistic fiction (well, mostly realistic, heh-heh :twisted:), defining "contemporary" as any date from 1960 on. But it seems like everyone and her dog is into writing fantasy. To some extent I could beta-read a fantasy novel and give useful feedback as to POV, characterization, consistency, and so on. But when the strange sentient creatures and the unpronounceable names and the mages and the shapeshifters and the spells start piling on, I shut off and I'm outta there. :eek:

    What types of writing would you like to beta-read? Or with your upcoming MA studies, do you want practice in all kinds?

    Cheers!
     
  3. KatieValino
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    KatieValino Member

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    Pleased to meet you :D

    I am open to most genres, I guess I would draw the limit at fact based non-fiction as I have next to no experience with that nor the vast knowledge needed. But I am open to most genres, I have had to study and analyse so many different books for my degree course that in all honesty I am used to going from Junk to Narnia in seconds. As for my approach. Grammar is not my strongest point I will not lie (Jan Foley knows this) but if I see any blazing errors I will help as best I can. I guess my main focal point in critiquing is to make sure there are no continuity errors, no simple mistakes and to make sure the story makes sense, is as concise as can be and flows well. I like to think my critique is of value. I have been in a writing circle since I was 15 and have always found myself as the one person that everyone goes to in order to run ideas by. That can only be judge by those who want to take up my beta reader offer.

    I think it is not so much about genre as about content. You can love crime novels, but if you read a crime novel that is a cagney and lacey style adventure then it may not be to your tastes. The only way you can really tell if you do or do not like something is not by genre but by reading. It could even be by the writing itself. Some people love Tolkien and his wordy prose, others prefer JK Rowling and her simpler text. I understand with Fantasy completely, there is even some Fantasy that I myself cannot stomach, again it is about the writing itself not the genre.

    I like to practice all kinds.
     

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