1. Gigi_GNR
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    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

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    Book recs?

    Discussion in 'Book Discussion' started by Gigi_GNR, Sep 14, 2011.

    Lately I've gotten bored with reading the same old thing again and again. I want to know, is there any book out there that I should read? I mean, people always list certain books, like 1984 or To Kill A Mockingbird, as books you should "read before you die", or something like that. Are there any books -- classics, more recent ones, anything -- that you consider "required reading" for anyone who loves to read? I'd love to have a few new books to check out. :)
     
  2. Heather
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    Heather Contributing Member

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    I don't know about them being classes as books you must read before you die, but I can suggest a few books I've enjoyed reading over the years.

    - The Great Gatsby by Fitzgerald. (Set during the years of prohibition in America and centres around the enigmatic, Mr Gatsby).
    - Of Mice and Men by Steinbeck. (Set in 1930's California, following two migrant workers and a ranch).
    - Memoirs of a Geisha by Golden. (Beautifully written account of a young Japanese girl sold to become a geisha).
    - The Bloody Chamber by Carter. (A collection of short horror stories, giving a gothic twist on classic fairytales).

    Not sure if any of the the above take your fancy, but I would definately recommend them.
     
  3. Dithnir
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    Dithnir Member

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    Go to guardian dot co uk and search for 'thousand books you should read before you die'.
     
  4. Faerytale
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    Faerytale New Member

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    Look up Tamora Pierce and Patricia Wrede for some new fantasy, and if all else fails, you can always re-read The Lord of the Rings :) L'Engle has some great stuff out (A wrinkle in Time, for instance) if you're into books with hidden meanings (sci-fi, fantasy, and historical fiction all in the same place!), McCaffrey for Sci-fi (particularly the Pern books), and the Bronte sisters and Dickens for some nice classics. Hope this helps!

    PS. I could have lived without reading 1984, personally.
     
  5. Steerpike
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    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

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    Second The Bloody Chamber.​ If you like YA fantasy check out Kristin Cashore.
     
  6. Gigi_GNR
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    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

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    Thanks. :)
     
  7. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    Bored? After something a little different?
    How about, Ridley Walker by Russel Hoban?

    It's a post nuclear holocaust deal, written in an English language that seems a mix of Chaucer and the colourful talk of the folk in A Clockwork Orange.

    The NY Times called it, ' stunning and delicious ' :eek:
    Anthony Burgess said: 'This is what literature is meant to be.' :eek:

    I have a copy but have not read it.
     
  8. CULLEN DORN
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    CULLEN DORN Member

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    If it's fiction you love to read. The book that comes to mind is 'The Razor's Edge' by W. Somerset Maugham.
    If it's nonfiction then the book I might suggest reading would be 'A Walk In The Woods' by Bill Bryson.
     
  9. Duality23
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    Duality23 New Member

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    It depends on the genre you are looking for, but off the top of my head...

    Atlas Shrugged- Ayn Rand
    Desperation- S. King
    From the Corner of his Eye- Koontz
    The Picture of Dorian Gray- Wilde
     
  10. AllThingsMagical
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    AllThingsMagical Member

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    Not too sure what type of things you're looking for but a few books I found kind of inspirational/really enjoyed are:

    Yes Man - Danny Wallace
    Googlewhack - Dave Gorman (In fact anything by Danny Wallace or Dave Gorman - they do silly things in their lives and then write about them in humorous ways.)
    One red Paperclip - Kyle McDonald
    The Learning Curve - Melissa Nathan (Best romance author I've ever read.)
    The Guy Next Door - Meg Cabot (Not a must read but the concept is interesting as it and the two sequels are written in emails, so it's something a little different.)
    Shade's Children - Garth Nix (Read this in my mid-teens but remember thinking it was pretty good.)
    I am Legend - Richard Matheson (I haven't seen the film because I enjoyed the book too much. And the book's got vampires rather than zombies in it.)

    And a few you've probably already read/heard of but thought I'd include anyway:
    Time Traveler's Wife - Audrey Niffenegger
    Lord of the Rings - J. R. R. Tolkein
    The Hitchhiker's guide to the galaxy - Douglas Adams
    Eragon/Eldest/Brisinger - Christopher Paolini (I know there's the massive debate that Eragon is a rip off of star wars/ LotR but I think the other two are better.)
    Lord of the Flies - William Golding (Had to do this one for GCSE's but found the idea really amazing.)
     
  11. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    Based on the books you've listed before as having read, you've read far more classics than I have, so not sure what to recommend there. But as for contemporary must-reads, have you read The Sky is Everywhere by Jandy Nelson? I absolutely loved that book. The writing is truly exquisite, although if you're the envious type, you will turn green reading it. ;)
     
  12. Gigi_GNR
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    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

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    Thanks guys. :)


    Preferably fiction books, but nonfiction is good too.
     
  13. Marcelo
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    Tales of the Otori by Lian Hearn: The tale of a young warrior named Takeo who struggles to avenge his adoptive father, escape the legacy of his biological father, and pursue the love of his life in the midst of an enormous power struggle involving dozens of clan lords and thousands of warriors. Tragic, the fantasy element is subtle, and the author really did her research on feudal Japan society.

    The City and the City, by China Mieville: It takes place in the cities of Besźel and Ul Qoma. These two cities actually occupy much of the same geographical space, but via the volition of their citizens (and the threat of the secret power known as Breach), they are perceived as two different cities. A denizen of one city must dutifully 'unsee' (that is, consciously erase from their mind or fade into the background) the denizens, buildings, and events taking place in the other city — even if they are an inch away.

    Tales from the Perilous Realm, by J. R. R. Tolkien: Containing Tolkien's lesser known and non-Lord of The Rings fiction. From poetry and short stories to novellas, these works are more in the vein of The Hobbit than the Lord of The Rings, as they have that same something that I could never quite name. Either way, they are very good reads and should not be missed!

    The Sandman, by Neil Gaiman: Regarded the best graphic novel of all times, all the way up next to Watchmen. The storylines primarily take place in the Dreaming, Morpheus's realm, and the waking world, with occasional visits to other domains, such as Hell, Faerie, Asgard, and the domains of the other Endless. Many use the contemporary United States of America and the United Kingdom as a backdrop. Most of the storylines take place in modern times, but many short stories are set in the past, taking advantage of the immortal nature of many of the characters, and deal with historical individuals and events.
     
  14. Tallandboring
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    Tallandboring Member

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    Philip Reeve's Mortal Engines Series Is by far the most imaginative and wonderful series I've ever read, I think this should be read by any fiction lover.

    Patrick Ness's Chaos Walking Trilogy Is so far the only books to ever bring me to tears, the main characters in this one are absolutely perfect.
     

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