1. mutants vs. vampires
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    mutants vs. vampires Member

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    if i tell you, you will find me. and you aren't su

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    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by mutants vs. vampires, Nov 1, 2008.

    I do not read like a regular person in my grade. I read WAY higher than most people in my entire SCHOOL. Well, anyway, my dad makes a big deal of what i buy and read. it's my money. and today i got the host by stephenie meyers, and he said that it was an adult book. he just made it sound like it was a terrible thing for me to be reading an adult book.????? :confused:
     
  2. The Freshmaker
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    The Freshmaker <insert obscure pop culture reference> Contributor

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    Well, first of all, Stephanie Myers isn't a very good author, so I would probably advise against reading that book, too.

    Second, I'm sure that he was talking more about the content of the book. You're intelligent, and you read at a higher level than most kids your age. However, he may not think that you're ready for any adult-themed literature. Example: Jane Eyre=good; American Psycho=bad.

    I know what you mean, though. I always read at a much higher level than my peers. And though my parents censored everything that I watched and listened to, and wouldn't let me have a subscription to Seventeen for all the gold in Fort Knox, they never really paid much attention to the books I read, many of which were actually far worse than anything I could have seen on TV.
     
  3. Acglaphotis
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    Acglaphotis Contributing Member

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    Actually I've heard that the Host is pretty good.Someone told me that it had to do with the question of one's self and stuff, but I don't really remember. I didn't like Twilight... I don't know why, I just didn't.
     
  4. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Freshmaker is correct. Parents usually do what they do for a good reason, and for quite different reasons than we tend to find convenient. Dad is just trying to protect you from content that he might find disagreeable, and that's his job as a good dad.

    Another example is curfews. Parents know full well that all the trouble one can get into after 11:00 pm can also be found well before 11:00 pm. It's not the point. Parents have to work in the morning and they want to go to sleep early, with peace of mind that everyone is back in the house at a decent hour. No good parent is going to sleep well knowing their kid is still out on the street. ;)
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    how old are you?
     
  6. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    Considering those books are shelved in the section for 12-18 year olds in the bookstores here, I see nothing wrong with you reading it. Even if it wasn't, it's just a book. The books that can potentially do harm by reading them are few and far between. Parents want to shelter their children, but I find that they try too hard these days. Children's books and TV shows are so innocent and watered down these days. It's like they don't want any real villains. In Dora the Explorer, they get rid of their "bad guy" by saying "Swiper, no swiping."

    Anyway, It's just a vampire story. Go ahead and read it.
     
  7. Acglaphotis
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    Acglaphotis Contributing Member

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    I'm sure they got tired of the endless parents calling about Dragon Ball Z or Rurouni Kenshin, haha.

    Nah, you're thinking of Twilight. The Host is a bit more, uhm, yeah, better. It's about this parasitic being which befriends it's host.
     
  8. mutants vs. vampires
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    mutants vs. vampires Member

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    aahhh...my book is great.....thank you for answering......
     
  9. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    Ah, my misunderstanding. I thought it was in the same set of books about the same characters.
     
  10. freeflow
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    freeflow Member

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    Personally, I loved the Host. It was really interesting and kept my interest. Im only 14, and I thought it was appropriate.
     
  11. Ennui
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    Ennui Member

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    Your father reputedly perceives that you are still not precocious,mutants vs. vampires.
    The likelihood is that the book might be melodramatic and is not befitting nor recommended.
    Reading literature classics is the optimal for you now.
     
  12. Heather Louise
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    Heather Louise Contributing Member Contributor

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    I am not sure on how old you are, but perhaps your father thinks that there is some unsuitable material in the novel. When I was younger, my dad didn't want me reading books such as Silence of the Lambs, because he didn't think the content was appropriate.

    Also, you may have took what he was saying wrong, he may have been impressed that you were taking an interest in reading and that you are reading at an advanced level for your age.
     
  13. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i repeat... how old are you???
     
  14. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    I don't think he/she wants to give her age. In her introduction thread she only said under 18.
     
  15. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    well, a lot depends on how far under... at 17, she'd have a valid complaint... at 10, not so...
     
  16. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    True. Though personally if I knew that my ten-year-old could read at that level, I wouldn't stop them. Like I said before, the books that can do harm by reading them are few and far between unless you're the kind of person that thinks reading Harry Potter will lead to becoming a witch.

    If I did believe that the subject matter would be challenging emotionally or could give my child bad ideas, I would not prevent them from reading it. I would read it myself and discuss it with them and make sure they understand whether or not it reflects reality and what it means if it does. I saw a program that talked about this sort of thing yesterday, with regards to the show Sex and the City and teenagers having sex/getting pregnant. In that show, they don't spend much time on the consequences of casual unprotected sex (as far as I know) and people who don't talk about the consequences, even if they know them, will forget about them in the moment, especially teenagers. Educators say that doesn't mean you shouldn't let them watch it. The best thing to do is to actually let them watch it if they want and talk to them about the show and what they do.
     
  17. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    On an interesting note, my mother was a very strong reader as a child and once read a book years before the movie version came out. They wouldn't let her in because she was "too young." Reading books like that did nothing to her but make her more open-minded.
     
  18. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    When I was 7 or 8, my mother found me sitting in the attic at my granparents' house, reading Perry Mason novels from the boxes of paperbacks in storage. She didn't tell me I couldn't or shouldn't read them, but she immediately went to the bookstore and returned with a stack of 'boy's books": Hardy Boys, Tom Swift, Rick Brant, Ken Holt...

    At every opportunity, I went to the bookstore down the street to buy another one, and I also quickly went through all the ones in the local library's collection.

    And when I didn't have enough allowance money for another book, or the bookstore didn't have any I hadn't yet read, I'd raid the attic again. Not just the paperbacks, but old textbooks as well. One of the treasures was my mother's college Chemistry text.

    There were books I recognized as "trashy" though. At that age, I generally got bored with them and picked up other books instead. After all, a lot of that stuff was just plain over my head.

    I believe in parental guidance, but not censorship. I've always encouraged my lkids to ask questions about what they read, and a lot of the time, I would ask the questions to get the ball rolling.
     

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