1. The95Writer
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    The95Writer Active Member

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    Can I publish any genre?

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by The95Writer, Feb 12, 2014.

    I have an interest in both fiction and non-fiction. Most of my fiction ideas are diverse by genre and I do want to write non-fiction about society and music too.

    But, can I be known for writing different types of books? (If I were to get successfully published).
     
  2. stevesh
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    stevesh Banned Contributor

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    This question has been asked before in different ways. My thought is that one should write what he/she wants to write, and if you end up as the science fiction master who also writes cookbooks, fine. The foodies may see you as the cookbook author who dabbles in science fiction. Also fine, as long as books are being sold.
     
  3. NigeTheHat
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    NigeTheHat Contributing Member Contributor

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    You can, though lots of people use pen-names when they move into a new area. These aren't always attempts to hide the identity, though - see Iain (M) Banks.

    An author's name works like a brand. If you become known for writing science-fiction, people will see you as a science-fiction author, so when your new romance book comes out some people might not buy it because they don't like aliens with their Mills & Boon.

    That's a problem for the future, though. Work on getting published first of all - when you've done that, you can decide if you want to write in new genres or move into non-fiction, and decide if you want a new name or not.
     
  4. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Sometimes there is crossover readers, from one genre to another. Sometimes even fiction and non-fiction, depending on the topic/genre. If you're a physicist and publish nonfiction on aspects of space travel or nuclear energy, and write hard science fiction, for example, that might work.

    The pen name issue, it depends. Sometimes keeping the same name with some genres can be a problem. Erotica and YA literature would be a good example.

    There are issues with pen names, but that's been discussed in depth in other threads.

    But like Nige TheHat said, it's not something to worry over until you've had works accepted for publication.

    From personal experience, I've had short stories published in a variety of genres--SF, Horror/Suspense, Inspirational, Mystery. There isn't a lot of crossover with some of the genres. All of my shorts were published in a collection by my publisher once all of the rights had reverted to me (from anthologies, magazines, and ezines where the stories had originally been published). That the variety is wide, hasn't helped sales.

    On the other hand, I have a couple fantasy novels in a series published. Then I had a SF novel published. Based upon the Amazon also bought, and the uptick in fantasy sales after the SF novel's release, there is a decent crossover between SF and Fantasy readers.
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    of course you can... you can also write screenplays, stage plays, song lyrics, ad copy, or whatever else you are able to write at a professional level...

    there's no law that says a writer must write only in one medium, or genre...
     
  6. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Isaac Asimov wrote fiction and nonfiction about almost everything there is without using as pen name. Sure, he's an unusual case, but it shows it can be done.
     
  7. JayG
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    JayG Banned Contributor

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    Here's the deal: Write a great story, one that will make the acquiring editor will turn handsprings. Then let them decide, because they know the necessities of the market at the time it's published.
     
  8. The95Writer
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    The95Writer Active Member

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    But, I don't want to be 'run' by a bunch of people. I have so many different ideas that fit different genres. And having people telling me I can't write them is bizarre.
     
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  9. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    who's going to 'run' you?

    what people told you that, or are going to tell you that?
     
  10. The95Writer
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    The95Writer Active Member

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    If the publishers or agents were to say, 'That doesn't fit your target market'.
     
  11. EdFromNY
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    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

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    Tom Clancy, James A. Michener, C.P. Snow, Ernest Hemingway, Charles Dickens and Stephen Crane are other examples of writers who penned both fiction and nonfiction (although some of Crane's reporting about the Spanish-American War should be considered fiction).
     
  12. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    'publishers/agents' wouldn't care what else you wrote, or even know what it might be... all they care about and know about is what you're submitting at the moment...

    and, if you meant your 'agent' and your 'publisher' if you should be lucky nough to have one of each, they also wouldn't care if you wanted to write something different...

    if they handle that medium/genre, it's just more business for them... and if they don't, they wouldn't care if you went to an agent/publisher who does, for those works, as long as your books they handle are doing well...

    in fact, it can even help to branch out, as your name would become familiar in more than one field, thus potentially increasing interest in the books they handle...
     

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