1. HorusEye
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    HorusEye Contributing Member Contributor

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    Carry round.

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by HorusEye, Jul 1, 2011.

    "I carry round this bag for a reason."

    Is "carry round" acceptable in casual dialogue? Is it considered lazy speech?

    Should it be written as "carry 'round", with an apostrophe?

    Cheers.
     
  2. MRD
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    MRD Senior Member

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    Around is what you're abbreviating, so you'll be wanting " 'round "
    "Round" is just circular...

    Although I'm not what you'd call a grammar expert, so I may be wrong.
     
  3. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    Would be a very peculiar person who objected. Absolutely fine. No apostrophe required.
     
  4. HorusEye
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    HorusEye Contributing Member Contributor

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    Thanks.
     
  5. Mallory
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    Mallory Mallegory. Contributor

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    I'd use the apostrophe, but that's just me - it's not something anyone should be touchy about.
     
  6. spklvr
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    spklvr Contributing Member Contributor

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    I've always been taught to use apostrophe if you skip letters, like "Teach 'em a lesson". So I would write 'round.
     
  7. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    Just so folk know: round is now (perhaps it was ever thus? not sure) an accepted synonym for around...so there is no omission of an 'a' here.

    Google n-grams is excellent for these sorts of tricky questions. Input the phrase and click on the time period that most interests you (for usage examples in published works).
     
  8. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i disagree... 'common' incorrect usage aside, it should still have an apostrophe, since the 'a' is elided... shouldn't those who consider themselves practitioners of the 'writer's art' adhere to a higher standard than the 'common herd'?...
     
  9. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    Carry round = proper correct usage.
    Carry around = proper correct usage.
    Carry 'round = proper correct usage.

    The English language, eh!
     
  10. [ESCAPE]
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    [ESCAPE] Member

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    At school I was taught that, yes, "i carry round" DOES rather count as lazy speech. So I personally think you should use the apostrophe... But, since art is saying above is possible, I digress.
     
  11. Trilby
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    Trilby Contributing Member Contributor

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    I'd play it safe and use an apostrophe - no-one can argue with that.



    p.s. afterthought, watch someone do just that.
     
  12. art
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    art Contributing Member Contributor

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    [​IMG]



    In order to excite the compassion of the people, the beggars carry round all the children they have, and thus deprive them of education. The usual mode of begging in the towns is for the mendicants to go from door to door, ..

    -Report on the Irish Poor, House of Commons, 1836

    The graph explains things nicely: around means round. Round predates around. Around has found such favour recently that when folk use the word 'round (in this sort of context) they feel obligated to use an apostrophe. There is no such obligation.

    But if you want to play it safe...join the common herd...then certainly, go with the apostrophe.;)
     

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