1. Wordeulist
    Offline

    Wordeulist New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0

    Connecting plots

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Wordeulist, Sep 13, 2013.

    I'm having an issue with finding ways to connect all the little scenes that I've written out. They are all part of one novel, but I can't seem to get from point A to point B. All I have is the points. Any ideas?
     
  2. erebh
    Offline

    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Messages:
    2,620
    Likes Received:
    467
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    give us an example...
     
  3. Wordeulist
    Offline

    Wordeulist New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have one battle scene that ends with one character being captured, then a scene later that involves the captured character being tortured. My problem is I can't figure out what to put in that ties in what happened after the battle to the time in the torture scene.
     
  4. minstrel
    Offline

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,724
    Likes Received:
    4,821
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    Welcome to the forum. Read the rules, and when you satisfy the posting requirements, you can show us your work so we can comment properly. Right now, you haven't given us enough information - we don't really know what your issue is.

    Take a look through the General Writing subforum (that's this place!) and you'll probably find your issue has already been discussed.

    In the example you just gave, though, I'd say you don't need anything to connect the battle to the torture scene. Just put the battle first, and readers will follow along. "Okay, there was a battle and this guy was captured. Now, in this new scene, he's being tortured. I get it."
     
  5. Wordeulist
    Offline

    Wordeulist New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    A better example would be the relationship between two of my characters. I know I want them to end up together, and they start out basically mortal enemies. I'm having trouble developing the relationship throughout the story. So, my problem I guess would be developing sub-plots within the larger plot.
     
  6. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    This might help: What is Plot Creation and Development?
     
  7. EdFromNY
    Offline

    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    4,684
    Likes Received:
    2,534
    Location:
    Queens, NY
    What is the story you are trying to tell? How do the scenes you've written help to tell it?

    When you answer those questions, then you will probably have solved your problem.
     
  8. killbill
    Offline

    killbill Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2012
    Messages:
    559
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    where the mind is without fear...
    I sense lack of basic plot development. Do as the above posts advises. What I would like to add is that it is not necessary that all the scenes you have written in your first draft should all end up in the last draft. So, don't hesitate to give up some scenes if it not an exact fit to the plot.
     
  9. EllBeEss
    Offline

    EllBeEss Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Aug 24, 2013
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    108
    Location:
    Perth
    I agree with what everyone else has posted, you need to get a better grip of your plot and story so your plot isn't disjointed.

    Don't just jump ahead of yourself. You can't have your characters nemesis one minute and then in love the next because you want them to be in love. Develop their relationship in the background while other stuff happens in the story.
     
  10. jannert
    Offline

    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 7, 2013
    Messages:
    7,809
    Likes Received:
    7,330
    Location:
    Scotland
    I'd agree with this up to a point. Some of the fun comes from finding a way for a scene to work into and/or enhance your plot. If you like the scene, see what you can do to fit it in and make it move the plot forward. Sometimes these connections aren't obvious at first.

    I feel if a scene has stuck in your head, it's probably there for a reason. Find that reason. Just keep working at it, playing with it, doing lots of 'what-ifs' and see what you come up with.

    Obviously, if you get all finished with your story and the scene still doesn't fit, then remove it without hesitation—use it in another story, if it's good enough. Just don't expect scene connections to make themselves immediately. Give them time to cook.
     
  11. minstrel
    Offline

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,724
    Likes Received:
    4,821
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    I agree with this. Being an artist often, if not most times, means trusting your instincts. If you're trying to write a scene and just can't, then maybe your instincts are telling you it doesn't belong. On the other hand, as @jannert says above, if it seems like it doesn't belong but you can't let go of it, maybe it's just in the wrong place. Maybe something else is in its way and needs to be cut.

    Always remember that you don't have to get everything right the first time. Almost nobody does. Write a draft even if you know it's not working. When it's on paper it's easier to look at objectively, so you'll have a better idea of what to do with your next draft. Keep at your story. Don't let it, or laziness or despair, beat you. If there's anything valuable in your original concept, you will be able to tease it out at some point.

    There is no deadline. If you have to write the story a second or third time, do so. Many writers do dozens of drafts before the story finally emerges. Keep trying. Sometimes the gold is buried very deep, but there's lots of it.
     
    jannert likes this.
  12. erebh
    Offline

    erebh Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 12, 2013
    Messages:
    2,620
    Likes Received:
    467
    Location:
    Los Angeles
    Also your story doesn't have to follow your MC from the cradle to the grave, for instance;

    Mick and Mary were in planning dinner (finish the scene)

    *****

    Jack loaded his gun. His vantage point from the tower block across the road gave him a perfect shot between Mick's eyes. The off-duty cop turned the stove up before bending to check the oven and...

    That might be a really crap example actually but it's late. What I'm trying to say is you can mix and match different scenes with different characters throughout your book to keep the reader wanting to know more. Check out the Venice Conspiracy by Jon Trace. In it, he fleets between the now and the 14th century but in the end it all marries up.

    Imagine a movie or even a soap opera. We don't see the tribulations of one family the whole duration, we see snapshots of the whole show with clips of all the families coming to a climax. Your story doesn't need to centre around one theme the whole time so you needn't worry but like everyone has said - as you get deeper in, you'll be cutting tons out and eventually it will all fit.
     
    jannert likes this.
  13. rhduke
    Offline

    rhduke Contributing Member Reviewer

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2013
    Messages:
    733
    Likes Received:
    158
    Location:
    Canada
    I'm not entirely sure what you're asking but I'll try. It can get confusing trying to combine subplots to get a perfect outcome. So one why way to focus your mind is to forget about the subplots for a second. Only think about your main plot, getting from point A to B. Don't think about the romance yet. Once you figure out the main actions your protagonist takes to get from A to B, then add subplots gradually. Each time you add a subplot think about how it affects the existing plot structure. You want it to have a purpose, whether it's developing a character's personality, creating a theme or world building.

    As for getting from A to B... well that's something we can't really tell you. It's safe to say that however you go about it, if you're maintaining the reader's intrigue and understanding, then you haven't gone wrong.
     
  14. Cogito
    Offline

    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    May 19, 2007
    Messages:
    35,935
    Likes Received:
    2,043
    Location:
    Massachusetts, USA
    The essential basis for connecting plots is understanding what a plot is, and how it differs from a storyline.

    A plot is an actor, a goal or objective, a motivation, and an opposition. Very often the opposition is in the form of another plot. See the link I provided above for more details.
     
  15. killbill
    Offline

    killbill Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 27, 2012
    Messages:
    559
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    where the mind is without fear...
    I agree. Yes, it does happen. Some scenes seemingly out of place to the plot might strike me and some instinct told me to keep writing it. But usually by the time I am half way through I knew exactly how to fit the scene even if I have to alter the plot. My point is if you have a firm grip on the basic plot line it shouldn't take you long to decide where to fit a scene, if the scene can be fitted at all, or do you have to make changes in the plot to accommodate the scene. You may have a completely different plot by the end of your draft, but having a clear plotline to begin with will make your life much more easier.
     
  16. Wordeulist
    Offline

    Wordeulist New Member

    Joined:
    Sep 13, 2013
    Messages:
    4
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thank you for all the advice everyone. I'll take a look at my writing and try to take a few steps back so to speak. Maybe a wider view of things will help.
     

Share This Page