1. nickbedford
    Offline

    nickbedford Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia

    Describing action in regards to point-of-view?

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by nickbedford, Jul 20, 2010.

    I've been going over the few chapters I've written for my first novel and while I think I've gotten to a point where the plot and writing is good to continue on, I'm still reconsidering points about how one should "angle" their writing (there might be a proper term for this).

    I'm wondering, given the following example, should I continue with the former style, or try using the latter style more often. That is, for a sci-fi action/suspense novel, would a more personal or more cinematic point-of-view suit better?

    Current (this isn't the protagonist by the way):

    More personal point-of-view:

    I'm at the point where I think I should rework the point of view to be more from the character's point of view rather than from an third person point of view as in the first excerpt while still keeping all the details I want of the scene present.

    What do you think?
     
  2. minstrel
    Offline

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,724
    Likes Received:
    4,821
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    The second version is better. In my opinion, keeping close to the character even in third person is better than writing from afar, if you see what I mean.
     
  3. nickbedford
    Offline

    nickbedford Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    81
    Likes Received:
    8
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Thanks. I do feel like it's a more engrossing point of view. A correction to myself, it is still third person, but it's putting focus on what the character is experiencing, not the scene itself.

    Further to this, if I was to go down this path, would it be advisable to keep things hidden from scene if the character cannot see it or experience it?

    For example, later on I have a similar event happen but in space with fighters and the object. The object begins shooting down the fighters.

    Currently the action is simply explained as it happens disregarding the fact that the protagonist isn't actually there to see it close up. In this example, he's still back on the battleship looking out from the hangar.

    i.e:
    to a character point of view such as:
     
  4. BlueWolf
    Offline

    BlueWolf Banned

    Joined:
    Jul 16, 2010
    Messages:
    168
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Germany
    Generally, when it from the perspective of the character in question, the reader sees and feels (if written correctly) what they see and feel. Using the other approach, you don't get the same feeling.

    Of course this isn't always necessary.
     
  5. lilix morgan
    Offline

    lilix morgan Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 15, 2009
    Messages:
    536
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Wonderland
    Personally, I've found it much more enjoyable when an author writes like you did in your second paragraph there in your second post. When you write in third person, everything doesn't have to be third person, but more of a third person with insight into a character or two, or three, all depending on the story and the set-up behind it.

    The best advice I can give is this; try all the different ways you can think to write it. See what you like, see what comes naturally, and find a compromise between the two should they be different answers.
     
  6. Islander
    Offline

    Islander Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2008
    Messages:
    1,542
    Likes Received:
    59
    Location:
    Sweden
    I agree that the second style is better. I call it "subjective point of view", but don't know if that's a standard term.

    I think so, but on a scene-by-scene basis. The point of view doesn't have to stay with the same character throughout the whole story.
     

Share This Page