1. peachalulu
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    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

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    Description - What do you like describing the most?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by peachalulu, Apr 14, 2015.

    Just curious, like the title says what do you like describing the most? I love colors, coming up with wild color descriptions. Probably harkens back to my Crayola caddy days - :). I also love clothing descriptions but half the time I can't work them in. Especially not in my short stories the characters are too busy. I also like to use describe setting as a way to hint at emotion.
    Any scenes that you especially love to get creative with?
     
  2. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    I like to describe (write) quick back and forth repartee. It's not always appropriate, though. :bigfrown: I'm often told (or discover myself) that my actors are sitting on a rather bare stage, witty as they may be. o_O
     
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  3. daemon
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    daemon Contributing Member Contributor

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    Describing the natural environment has a therapeutic quality.
     
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  4. Megalith
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    Megalith Contributing Member Contributor

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    I definitely and easily go overboard with describing settings and key elements. I keep cutting but it never seems like enough. :meh:
     
  5. Gloria Sythe
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    Gloria Sythe Member

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    I often find that too many new writers tend to over-do narrative descriptions. Some tend to be overly poetic and repetitious. I find this flaw more so in self published material. I read a self published work about a month ago titled "The Scape Goat" (I can't remember the author's name); however, at least 50% of the story was describing plants, flowers, facial expressions and body movements. The story line was lost in a narrative that did not move the story in any manner. Narrative, to me, must be very closely connected to the story line (to enhance the story's progression towards an ending).
     
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  6. Ozzy
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    Ozzy Member

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    My characters. I love trying to describe to someone what a man's face looks like when all I have is a picture in my head. I tend to try out my descriptions on my sisters (over skype) to see if they can find a picture similar to what I'm describing. I'm always excited when they find matches. Then, I can reword my descriptions to match what they understood.
     
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  7. EdFromNY
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    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

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    I like to use incidental descriptions to draw out a scene and break up long stretches of dialogue.
     
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  8. obsidian_cicatrix
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    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

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    I can very easily go overboard if I let myself, but my favourite descriptions are those that occur in transit from A to B, forcing me to be concise so as not to clutter the action and dialogue.
     
  9. Keitsumah
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    Keitsumah The Dream-Walker Contributor

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    Combat or the scenery around the character -though I can easily go overboard on the latter. One particular combat scene I'm working on starts with this:

     
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  10. 123456789
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    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I looooooove similes.
     
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  11. peachalulu
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    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

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    I wish I could like them. Transitions actually make me very nervous. I always wonder if I'm ending a scene on the right note or rambling.
     
  12. matwoolf
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    matwoolf Contributing Member Contributor

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    Similes are embarrassing when you return to a draft and every paragraph builds to a 'like.' Easily fixed: like
     
  13. 123456789
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    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

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    All you had to say was metaphor.
     
  14. matwoolf
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    matwoolf Contributing Member Contributor

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    Similes are embarrassing when you return to a draft and every paragraph builds to a 'like.' Easily fixed: metaphor.
     
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  15. Commandante Lemming
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    Commandante Lemming Contributing Member Contributor

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    Hmmm. I have most of my fun with the dialogue (Regular critique: "Why do I feel like I'm reading a screenplay?!)

    But I think I get the most fun out of providing people with images they don't quite expect from the setting. My main setting is a 2034 near-future and I love showing shiny 2015 stuff either rusting or being used for nostalgia. I really got a kick writing a piece where my adult characters were sitting in their childhood hangout on the roof of the family diner and I note that the beat-up old MP3 boombox lost it's capacity to download years ago. I did another one where the characters were in a comic book shop and the characters got all nostalgic about how Marvel might have to cancel the "Guardians of the Galaxy" series due to declining readership.

    That or putting forward weird things as if they're normal - I have too much fun outfitting the menu of my 2034 Starbucks knockoff (it's a Taiwanese bubble-tea/espresso joint and everything is bright pink and basically inspired by Hello Kitty). And I think my best one was a story I started in an alternate present where a native South American tribe survived to become a modern Christianized nation - one of my opening scenes involved the protagonist getting mad at a vending machine in the old cathedral because she thought four florins was too much for a bag of "Kelpie" snacks (there are too many jokes about seaweed in that text).
     
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  16. Renee J
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    Renee J Contributing Member

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    I should add more descriptions. I'm sparse in that area.
     
  17. Podam
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    Podam Member

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    I'm a very visual person, and I often illustrate my stories. I think that might make me be a bit weak on writing out the setting, and describing what I've already put down on the paper in the form of a drawing. But when I do describe, it is almost always the weather. And the weather and my person's mood are often tightly linked. I'm working on that, because it feels too much like a cliche.
     
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  18. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    :superidea:
    Think I'll dig out my son's giant box of crayons. There are bound to be some great ideas in there for names of colors.
     
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  19. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Writing descriptions is still like pulling teeth for me, but I want to write them. It's just that I'm still working on that skill.
     
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  20. neuropsychopharm
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    neuropsychopharm Active Member

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    I'm with you on that. I tend toward less description in my own writing and am almost always impressed when people pull it off without it feeling overwrought or unnecessary.

    I do think, though, if I were speaking about my writing right now I'm pretty good with describing physical and emotional feelings in a neat way.
     
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