1. Shahar
    Offline

    Shahar Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    1

    Development of writing style.

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Shahar, Jun 20, 2011.

    As I was writing I noticed that the further I go the more my writing develops. It makes sense, however, doesnt it have implications about my story? Wouldn't a reader notice the shift in styles? Or maybe this is something I'll just have to (I dont want to say 'fix') change as I go through the drafts?
     
  2. Suadade
    Offline

    Suadade Senior Member

    Joined:
    Jun 16, 2011
    Messages:
    101
    Likes Received:
    4
    Location:
    Sweden
    I know just what you mean. Especially writing in first person, it's as though it takes a page or two before you really get to know your own character.

    If you're concerned with this showing in your writing, I'd say do some exercises. Write another story with the same characters, or the same setting or what have you. The stories don't have to be good or have a plot or anything, they're just for your own disposable use. Then when you feel you've gotten into the groove, start work on the real story. =)
     
  3. -oz
    Offline

    -oz Active Member

    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Messages:
    132
    Likes Received:
    18
    Location:
    The Great Sandy Waste
    I've noticed this in a few really long books, that the author's style changed as he wrote. To be honest, it didn't bother me because writing styles usually only get better, not worse, so it wound up immersing me into the stories the more of them I read.
     
  4. VM80
    Offline

    VM80 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2010
    Messages:
    1,211
    Likes Received:
    43
    Location:
    UK
    I think when you revise later, you can try and bring everything to the same 'standard'.

    I had some trouble when revising parts of something (very) old I'd written. Initially, I wanted to change only some things, but noticed how different my style is now v then.

    What I did is revise the whole thing in the end to have some consistency throughout.
     
  5. Tesoro
    Offline

    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2011
    Messages:
    2,825
    Likes Received:
    290
    Location:
    A place with no future
    I agree with VM80. That is one of those stuff you correct when revising. I notice the same thing in my WIP, and I find it rather pleasant to see I have learned while writing the same piece of work. I just hope that I will be able to see through the old version and come up with an improved way of writing the same parts. I think I have a tendency to get blind to my own errors even though Im not completely satisfied with it, that is when I start rewriting the same part/chapter/scene from scratch, with new words instead of changing words here and there.
     
  6. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    this is why the beginning fiction writer would be wise to start out with short stories and not jump right into a novel...

    as you write short stories, you'll be developing your 'voice' and by the time you've honed your basic skills with a few [or many, if it takes that long], you'll be able to get through to the end of a novel in a single voice/style, instead of ending up with a patchwork quilt that reads as if a committee wrote it...
     
  7. Shahar
    Offline

    Shahar Member

    Joined:
    Jun 1, 2011
    Messages:
    29
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the help :)
    I have a story stuck in my mind and the length it will require is out of my control. And because I cant seem to get it out of my head I guess I will just have to develop my skills and style through it.
     
  8. thalorin19
    Offline

    thalorin19 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2010
    Messages:
    72
    Likes Received:
    1
    Location:
    Colorado,
    I've noticed this with authors as well, and myself.

    I'm on the third book of Stephen King's The Dark Tower series, and his writing is much better then the first one. Not that the first book was badly written, but his style is just more different. I also think at this point he really knew who he was as a writer, as compared to The Gunslinger when he wrote it back in the 78'.

    Once you find your writing style though, you really take off. Beginning writers always have trouble putting their thoughts into words cause they don't know how without seeming clunky. But once you hit that groove, you improve.
     
  9. barnz
    Offline

    barnz Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2011
    Messages:
    48
    Likes Received:
    0
    The more you write, the more developed your voice becomes. When you reach the end of the work, it's a good idea to unify the work with consistent voice in revising and editing.
     
  10. AmyHolt
    Offline

    AmyHolt Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 22, 2011
    Messages:
    475
    Likes Received:
    17
    Location:
    Warsaw, IN
    I think it's amazing that your first draft is even readable. Mine always sucks and voice is the last thing I'm worried about. :)
     
  11. Gigi_GNR
    Offline

    Gigi_GNR Guys, come on. WAFFLE-O. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2009
    Messages:
    12,143
    Likes Received:
    250
    Location:
    Milwaukee, WI
    It's a good thing if your writing improves. The first draft is almost unreadable sometimes, and you can always go back and edit.
     

Share This Page