1. Kamaria
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    Kamaria New Member

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    Different Points of View

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Kamaria, Jan 31, 2013.

    My most recent project is a fantasy series that I have been working on for about a year and a half. I started having every book narrated in third person but then switched to first person because I felt like I write better in first person and I think it makes the books flow better. I wanted my protagonist to narrate all the books. Then, for some reason, I started writing sections from another character's point of view. Finally, I decided to have two 'sections' to each book - one complete story narrated by my protagonist and the same story narrated by someone else. Does anyone know if this has been done before? I assume it has been done but I just have not heard of anyone using this technique. I would love to read something like this; I like to get multiple points of view into what is going on.

    If someone has tried it, have you found yourself starting out with the plot but then deviating? The first book in my series has the second section narrated by the antagonist. And he keeps trying to change things around on me. So far, I believe they have been good changes and I think that they really help my novel. I like having both points of view presented; I think it adds something to my series. My antagonist is a fun character to write and I love to get into what he is thinking and feeling during the story. I feel like I have a better understanding of him and his motives by writing this alternate novel. It is also helping me develop secondary characters as some alternates are written from their point of view.

    Any thought and/or experiences you would like to share?
     
  2. NellaFantasia
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    NellaFantasia Member

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    I tried something like this several years ago, only instead of writing the same story twice with two different viewpoints I divided the first person viewpoints into chapters. For instance, chapter one was in Character A's viewpoint, written in first person, and then chapter two was in Character B's viewpoint, also first person, and so on and such. Sometimes I would write the same scene from each viewpoint because it gave such a drastic difference in perspective.

    I've never read anything like what you described, but you could always try it. That's the glorious thing about writing. If it doesn't work you can change it.
     
  3. PhilipJLeae
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    PhilipJLeae New Member

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    In Darren Shan's Demonata series he writes from three different points of views, but he switches between them when changing books. (Warning it's supposed to be a horror series!) So, if you're looking for an example you could try that.

    I've tried something similar. From a first person point of view, but occasionally I'll have a conversation between two characters right before or after the narrator leaves the room, or is out of ear shot. Hope this helped.
     
  4. radnommandess
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    radnommandess Member

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    Robert Rankin chops and changes povs quite a lot. Particularly the suburban book of the dead where he succesfuly brings a first person charact into a third person characters chapter and runs both povs simultaeneously.
     
  5. Sved
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    Sved Senior Member

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    Orson Scott Card did it as well. He wrote about the same events from a different POV.
     
  6. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Lawrence Durrell wrote a series of four novels called The Alexandria Quartet, in which each novel deals with the same events, but seen from a very different point of view. The series is considered a classic of twentieth-century literature and nearly snagged Durrell the Nobel Prize for Literature (he was up for the prize the year John Steinbeck won).
     

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