1. captken
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    captken Member

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    "Disremember" Do you ever use this word?

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by captken, Nov 3, 2012.

    My grandfather used "Disremember" or "Disremembered" often. The older he got, the more he disremembered.

    As I recall, Pap didn't forget much but he often disremembered things. At 70, I find myself disremembering
    things from time to time and I'm beginning to use Pap's word when speaking or writing. My definition of disremember is,
    "Something not completely remembered in time or context." Disremembering long ago events is a great excuse for some serious
    creative license when writing old tales.

    I wrote a tale for my Mom for a Mother's Day present about 30 years ago. The tale was about one of my earliest
    memories of her dad, my Pap. I realized I "Disrememberd" parts of the actual event so I started the tale with this line:
    "Memories, like pebbles in a brook, are smoothed and gently rounded by the fast flowing stream of time." That line
    let me off the hook for accuracy.

    These days I am still a lot like an elephant; I never forget. I will, however, occasionally admit to disremembering.
     
  2. evelon
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    evelon Active Member

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    Love that word - and I think it may well become a very often used part of my vocabulary - if I don't disremember it! I love home-made words. My friend is always asking me to 'plasticate' recipes and such. She means 'laminate' but I have to say, I like her word better.
     
  3. Mckk
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    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I feel like you've just given a lovely introduction to a quaint little story.
     
  4. stratwriter
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    stratwriter New Member

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  5. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    I didn't even know it was a word until I looked it up. I see it's listed as colloquial, so I suspect it's just from certain parts of the USA.
     
  6. captken
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    captken Member

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    I need to confess. I live in Crystal River, Florida but to use a colloquial phrase, "I was raised up in Alabama." The Alabama I knew as a boy was still Old South. I was a member of the C of C, Children of the Confederacy and later became a member of Sons of the Confederacy. The phrase I quoted above "I was raised up in Alabama" doesn't mean up in Alabama but I was "raised up" up in Alabama. Maybe I should say, I spent my formative years in Alabama but then I lose the opportunity to use "Raised up.".

    I often murder the King's English with my use of colloquialisms and I often do it with great joy. It would be a shame to see all of these good ole' "Suthrn" expressions die and I, for one, plan to help keep them alive.

    Aw, doggone the luck. I used loose in the first paragraph instead of lose. I know the difference even if I was "Raised up" in Alabama
     
  7. Jovon Green
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    Jovon Green New Member

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    No time in my life, have I ever recalled, a time I knew of the word disremember.
    For all my work and toil and how I now write, it is astonishing to me, that I can always learn more.



     
  8. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    i've heard and read it, but wouldn't think of using it...
     
  9. evelon
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    evelon Active Member

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    There was a programme on TV where one of the detectives (UK programme, I think) was heard to say - 'I want this forensicating'. Makes sense and cuts down your word count.
     
  10. digitig
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    digitig Contributing Member Contributor

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    Standard English is not the only variety of English, and pretty much all of them have their place. Some of them even have their own publications. We are thankfully starting to learn the value and validity of regional dialects and growing out of the need to try to force one form of English on everybody.

    That said, when trying to communicate between people who use different forms of English, it's essential to have some common ground, and that's where standard English forms of English come in, which is why all the advice on this forum is about using those standard forms (Standard British English, Standard American English and so on).
     
  11. steve119
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    steve119 Senior Member

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    Don't you mean the queens English old chap lol
     

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