1. Brightsmiles
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    Brightsmiles Senior Member

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    do you procrastinate your books end?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Brightsmiles, May 23, 2009.

    im finding that as im working my way through my current novel, i've REALLY started to procrastinate. it wasn't much at first but its slowly getting more and more to the point where its now just down right ridiculous.

    at first i thought it was because i didn't know exactly how i wanted to write it, (i had three possible avenues) but now i've realised its not about where i should take it, as much as the realisation that i don't actually want to finish it! (the writing process)

    and yes, its exciting to finish and see that stack of paper - but i'm sad about it. i don't want it to end. i'm attached to my story and procrastinating its end! anyone else feel this way?

    maybe this is why robert jordans wheel of time is the way it is :p
     
  2. shadowblaze83
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    shadowblaze83 Member

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    All I can say is that writing, much like life is a journey. Along the way you learn, grow, make mistakes, and if you've worked hard enough, you get it right. However unfortunate it may be to come to the end of such a fulfilling endeavor, you must rejoice in the fact that with writing, unlike life, the end of a book, simply means being able to start a whole new one. This enables you to experience the joy of living/writing all over again.
    I cannot wait to finish my first book. It will be interesting to see what comes out of me in the end. That's what I look forward to.
     
  3. chandler245
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    chandler245 Banned

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    I get that way at times, mine is due to my life being so crazy and I don't want my only repreive to go away. So I get brain block (subconsiously I think my brian does it on purpose) so that it won't end. I love my book with all my heart but I can't let it end, so I feel the way that you do.
     
  4. starseed
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    starseed Contributing Member

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    Haha no I'm not this way. I want to be done already so I can work on something else! :)
     
  5. Dalouise
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    Dalouise Contributing Member

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    I don't think either of mine will ever end, as I keep finding ways to improve them!
     
  6. JGraham
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    JGraham Senior Member

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    I am this way and it annoys me. I am almost at the end of my first novel and i just keep thinking about it. I want the end to be so good, that i just wont take that first step and start writing it. But i know once i start i will be satisfied, and i can always go back and edit it when i am done.
     
  7. Gallowglass
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    Gallowglass Contributing Member Contributor

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    Have some chance of a sequel, even if you don't intend to write one.
     
  8. Brightsmiles
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    Brightsmiles Senior Member

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    thanks guys! glad to know i'm not going crazy on my lonesome with it!
     
  9. Dr. Doctor
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    Dr. Doctor Contributing Member

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    Why? I wouldn't do this for most stories.
     
  10. Gallowglass
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    Gallowglass Contributing Member Contributor

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    A) It leaves questions, making the reader wonder and adding more reread value
    B) It makes it more realistic - how many real-life events end perfectly?
    C) If you get attached to your stories, it's not actually finished so you can do a sequel
     
  11. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    I would say never, ever do this....unless what you're writng is fantasy, or maybe a serial romance or something. General fiction should (IMO, I guess) always be self-contained, and while you should leave your reader with some things to think about, doing this by simply throwing in a few red herrings at the end to open up a sequel is a cheap shot. Write your novel properly and the reader should have more than enough to think about to make it worth re-reading.
     
  12. KP Williams
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    KP Williams Contributing Member

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    Who says leaving an opening for a sequel requires a "cheap shot"? All you need to do is give yourself at least a little wiggle room. It doesn't even have to build on anything from the previous installment; the sequel can be another stand-alone, almost entirely unrelated, if you want it to be. I'm reminded of Ted Dekker's Project Showdown trilogy. All self-contained, complete stories, but still sequels/prequels to one another. It's impossible to tell that the second book is even vaguely related to the first until about halfway through.

    That's basically a long way of saying there's almost always room for a sequel if you wish. No cheap tricks required
     
  13. Dr. Doctor
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    Dr. Doctor Contributing Member

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    A good novel leaves questions without making an opening for a sequel. To think otherwise is silly - how many great literary works are there that can't provoke as much discussion and thought as a more modern series?

    You can make it perfectly realistic without doing that, too - if the dialogue and actions and characters are believable, who cares that it ends? And not all stories end perfectly; what are you talking about? Even real life has different events and periods of peoples' lives that eventually end, just like a novel does.

    Fair enough. I'm not saying people shouldn't do sequels, I'm just saying they also shouldn't make it seem like there will be one. It can be done well, but sometimes there's just only so much you can do with a story.
     

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