1. RainbowWarrior
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    RainbowWarrior Member

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    does this only happen to me?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by RainbowWarrior, Apr 27, 2013.

    some days i think about the ideas for my book, and think stuff like "this is gonna be so good!" and i get really happy.

    but then other days my brain suddenly goes all negative on me and i think stuff like "this story is ridiculous. people will hate it" (this usually happens when i watch a film based off a good book, and then i think about how awesome the author must've been)

    thing is, i WOULD put my ideas forward, but im VERY worried about people not liking them and then they reply with loads of criticisms, which would make me sad.

    help meh :(
     
  2. Eric242
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    Eric242 Member

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    Well just remember that all their criticism is there for you! They want to help you become a better writer. They are going to be honest (which may hurt) but it's all to help you.

    Second... Some people probably will hate it, so prepare yourself. Everyone has different tastes, so if one person really doesn't like it, don't lose heart. The next person to come along may love it.

    Either way, you won't really know until you share.
     
  3. Misha94
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    Misha94 New Member

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    I think this generally happens to a lot of people. I know that I write down hundreds of ideas and only 5 percent seem any good when I look back at them after a couple of weeks. I suppose sometimes you have to trust yourself and think about who you are writing for and whether they, as reader, would relate to your topic of choice.
     
  4. Oswiecenie
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    Oswiecenie Active Member

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    Oh yes, I know that feel. Happens to me all the time. Just keep reminding yourself that you are writing for yourself first and foremost. Don't waste your time and energy worrying what other people might think of your work.
     
  5. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    Well, yes of course, I imagine most of us feel like that. Either occasionally or often.

    Here's the thing. No matter how good you are, or how popular an author you are (or will be) there will always be people who dislike your writing. So don't expect everybody to love it, even if it's flawless. They won't.

    I think when taking critiques on this forum, you must ask yourself if the criticisms makes sense to you. If you think - yep, they're right, I should do more—blank, whatever—then take the criticism on board. If you think the critics didn't 'get' your writing, stop and think—is this my fault? Have I written this badly? If so, take the time to absorb their reasons. If they haven't bothered to give any reasons, however, they are not good at giving critiques, so dump them! Immediately. Don't take what they've said to heart at all.

    There will be people who hate the genre you write in. People who prefer longer or shorter pieces than what you've written. People who scratch you off their 'like' list if you dare to use an adverb, or highlight a word in italics. These folks are not your target audience. They will always be there. So will you. As long as you're not making actual 'mistakes,' but are simply writing something they don't like, you can choose to ignore them. Or take their preferences on board. You're just here to get advice. You can pick and choose what advice you take.

    To sum it up: post your stuff, and then consider the source, when the comments pour in. Some will be incredibly helpful to you. Others will not.

    Keep in mind, MOST of us on this forum are just like you. Unpublished authors. Even the published ones should be taken with a grain of salt, unless they've published in the same field as your own. Somebody who has just published their PhD thesis on the sex life of the inchworm, may not be the best person to diss or praise your poetry!
     
  6. ARDD
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    ARDD Member

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    I think criticism should be embraced, that doesn't mean you have to like it but if it helps you look at your work in a different light then it should help you grow as a writer. I'm sure every one feels the way you do from time to time but nobody is perfect, even Hemmingway said 'the first draft of anything is sh**'.
     
  7. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    You need to ignore all that and just write with reckless abandon.

    You will get criticism, everyone does--that's just a fact of life. But that's a good thing--it helps you improve.

    Stay strong. You can do it. :D
     
  8. RainbowWarrior
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    RainbowWarrior Member

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    aww thanks so much! :redface:
     
  9. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    You are most welcome. :D
     
  10. jeepea
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    jeepea Member

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    If you only put your ideas forward, it's unlikely that you'll get much constructive criticism from this forum. Most people will tell you that an idea is only as good as how well you realize it through your writing. I suggest doing as Jhunter said and 'write with reckless abandon'. When you've finished your book or at least a chapter or two, edit what you have written until you feel that you absolutely cannot improve it. Then submit it to the forum, knowing you've done your best. As has been mentioned above, you will get comments from all points of view. Take heed of the ones that apply and ignore the rest. After all, you are the author of your story and ultimately know what's best.
     
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  11. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    It might encourage you, RainbowWarrior, to go to Amazon and look up some literary classics, just to read the reviews. Even books that have stood the test of time and are acknowledged as masterpieces get their share of scathing reviews. There are many people out there who just can't stand The Great Gatsby or The Old Man and the Sea or Lolita or the works of Thomas Pynchon or Margaret Atwood or Saul Bellow. There are people who just piss all over the works of Nobel Prize winners, Man Booker Prize winners, Pulitzer Prize winners, and so on.

    The point is, no matter how great your work is, there will always be people who hate it, who think it's trash and crap and rubbish that should never have been published. So if someone tells you your work sucks, well, that puts you in the same category as Hemingway and Joyce and even Shakespeare. (Yes, a lot of people think Shakespeare's work is trash.)

    Soldier on. Jhunter said it extemely well: "Just write with reckless abandon." That's good advice for all of us.
     
  12. ProsonicLive
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    ProsonicLive Senior Member

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    Ever hear "there is no such thing as a bad Part, only bad actors"? or maybe is was small part/small actor? in any case, ANY story can be told well. some plots are better than others to some people.. also, keep in mind the genre of your title. if someone does not like it, you may just be asking the wrong person. Don't put all your hopes and dreams into a persons opinion if that person prefers romance and your book echos Issac Asimov. I personally read Horror and hi-tech mystery. Meaning that James Patterson is not my cup of tea, but a good writer nonetheless. The book of psalms is quite eloquent, but do not ask an atheist or nihilist about it. I am sure there are writers who could make an amazing story about a trip to Costco. Basically, break down your plot to one topic. The book I am working on, for example, could be broken down into a simple topic. a town finds out that its inhabitants are disappearing and being judged by ?????? knowing that, I know what the story needs to accomplish. The vehicle I choose to get there is totally up me. As long as I accomplish the goal I sat out to achieve, I can do it however I choose; such as long as I play by the rules. Those rules are established as I go. Keep in mind these rules have a default. if you are to change them, let the audience know that the rules are different. For example, if the whole story has been set in a universe that echoes ours. neither the protagonist or antagonist may not suddenly have control over a Death-star like weapon. Example;

    "Jessie and Roy struggled for the knife. Roy held his left knee on Jessie's right hand. Jessie Tried to wriggle his center of gravity in a last ditch effort to off-set Roy's. Jessie had no energy left and knew He would loose if he did not do something quick. He inhaled deeply and yelled as loudly as he could. Then, a team of Velosa-raptors stormed in wielding lightsabers and covered in chainsaws they quickly aimed for roys head and shot lightning bolt after lightning bolt at Roy's face until he exploded."

    unless you explained a LOT of this in the narrative. you will have left your audience with a "hu"? so, just be sure that you work within your own rules. It will lead to a far better story no matter who reads it.
     
  13. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    This ^

    I wrote my whole duology out in a month. A year and a half later I'm 3/4 done with book one. The story basics are the same but many of the scenes have changed and the story structure was revised.

    I change one scene and that requires I change another. I've got the opening chapter down to one of three options, but when I tried to write it first, I couldn't get it right. So I went past it instead. I've written backstory chapters I may or may not use. (That's hard because when you love a scene you hate to think about tossing it.)

    Overall, I'm really happy with the way the story is developing. It will only distantly resemble that first draft.

    You have a theme, an idea, that's what I have. Build the story around it, don't worry if you have the beginning or end down, I think those are the hardest chapters to write. If you come to a place things don't work, just go past it. When the story is more developed, an answer for those rough spots will be more apparent.
     
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  14. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    I agree. My first chapter two years ago is now my third chapter, today.
     

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