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  1. Crinkle420
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    Crinkle420 New Member

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    Double Meaning

    Discussion in 'Writing Prompts' started by Crinkle420, Apr 15, 2007.

    Words with double meaning can drastically change the meaning of a story, or sentence.

    Here is something I made
    --
    The famous cat burglar - once known as the famous locksmith - was practicing his new profession when the police arrived. He quickly made a bolt for the door.
    --

    Does anyone else know any cool ones?
     
  2. ItalianStallion
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    ItalianStallion Senior Member

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    .....Nope......
     
  3. Onoria Westhrop
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    Onoria Westhrop Contributing Member

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    Double or triple meanings are all very amusing, but we now live in the culture of the "single" meaning.

    I do however remember that it used be the case that anytime I, or one of my friends said something with a second meaning, the other would say "Said the Vicar to the prositute."
    For example, stood outside a second hand furniture store looking for a table, my good friend, who we will call Mr.Y met a young girl examining an ornamental oak coat stand. In a feeble attempt to strike up conversation he asked, "So do you like a bit of wood?"
    Another friend, who we will call Mr.B said, "Said the Vicar to the prositute."
    Thus forever destroying any hope of Mr.Y getting anywhere. Double entendre's are the enemy of people like me who live with the curse of foot in mouth disease.
     
  4. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    But double meanings are the soul of the pun. I love playing with words, and punning is an exercise in shifting semantics.

    Isaac Asimov has called the pun the highest form of humor.
     

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