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  1. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Drama SCRIPT help please!

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Ashleigh, Dec 1, 2009.

    Just a quick question:

    My play is set in Scotland, and I was originally planning to write the actors/actresses dialogue with scottish dialect, as opposed to standard english.

    I have to write a critical analysis of this for the second half of the assessment, and I'm not sure whether i'd be better off not attempting Scottish dialect (although i'm confident that I could make it realistic) or whether I should just write it in standard English, and say that the actors would be expected to use Scottish accents/dialect? If I had a few examples, though, then I could analyse alot based on the language used.

    I'm not sure....I'm thinking maybe I should actually write it in Scottish dialect, but I don't want to over-do it for the sake of it being there either, because if it sounds false and over exaggerated then I could potentially ruin the illusion of the whole play.

    Do you think a few words would suffice? Such as 'Donnae' instead of 'Don't' for example?
     
  2. candafilm
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    candafilm New Member

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    I wouldn't write everything in the dialect since it would probably get pretty hard to read. Just explain that they have a scottish accent and the actors should be able to come up with it on their own. You could throw in a couple of words that reflect the dialect just to remind the actors or to put an emphasis on a phrase. Try to avoid any words you'd have to explain to someone that could potentially not be from that area.
     
  3. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Okay, good idea. Thanks for that Candafilm, I think you're right.

    ------------------------------------

    I'll go with Candafilm on this one (as i'm handing it in tomorrow, too), but if anybody else would like to contribute their opinion, then please do so - you could be bringing up some interesting points for others and myself in the future.
     
  4. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    I like it when writers include dialect (accurate dialect, that is). It gives the play a more authentic feel, IMO.

    John Synge, an Irish playwright, used dialect very accurately in his plays. Not only did it add to the play, but it also allowed for puns and the like that wouldn't have been ordinarily possible in "regular" English. If you get the time, I highly suggest checking out some of his work.
     
  5. McDuff
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    McDuff Member

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    The great american writer Louis L'Amour wrote in dialect in some of his earlier books about 18th century England, Ireland and Scotland. I say if you know the dialect and can do it justice, then go for it and more power to ya!
     
  6. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    See, I like this idea too, and I know what you mean. However, my play isn't going to be acted, so i'm worried about it for the sake of readbility I guess...

    I'll see if I can find some examples by the playright you mentioned in the library; we have a big selection here, so it'll be very useful if I decide to go with dialect.
     
  7. Ashleigh
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    Ashleigh Contributing Member Contributor

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    Gaah. Now i'm verging on wanting to use dialect. We hand our drafts in tomorrow, so I spose i'll just ask my tutor what he'd suggest I should do.

    I'm kinda of caught between both now.
     
  8. bluebell80
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    bluebell80 Contributing Member

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    If this is something for a class, it is best to go with whatever is the simplest to write. You can have the understanding that if this were done as an actual play that the words spoken would be in a thick Scottish brogue. You would write it, however, in mostly normal American English, with a few select words (unique to Scottish dialect) written in the accent.

    Since Scotland and Ireland are both Gaelic based dialects, you will have strangely spelled and spoken words here and there. I know working in the Travel industry and in Retail, that people from those countries do have odd words and phrases for everyday common things. Much the way the UK English differs from American English. I wrote a short story with a supporting character who had an Irish accent, and only a few words here and there were key for the effect. It doesn't take much for the effect to be read.
     
  9. arron89
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    arron89 Banned

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    Wow I can't believe no one has mentioned Irvine Welsh....he writes in dialects so thoroughly that if you weren't familiar with them it would be like reading another language, and he's still regarded as one of the greatest British contemporary writers...
     
  10. TimAyro
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    TimAyro Member

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    I say mix it up. Put in some well known Scottish words, but not to the point the reader is confused.
     
  11. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    since this is a class assignment, you should be asking your tutor, not us...

    but as it's a play, you don't need to [and shouldn't] write the dialog in dialect, just use the appropriate syntax, when structuring your sentences and indicate in the opening script notes that all the characters speak in dialect...

    the problem with that is some of your actors may not know how to!
     

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