1. Mafuane
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    Mafuane New Member

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    Drawing a blank when it comes to descriptions, help resources!!

    Discussion in 'Research' started by Mafuane, Sep 6, 2010.

    One of the major flaws I see in my writing is that I always draw a blank when describing architectural objects, such as what is a plaza or a balustrade exactly? and would they fit together architecturally? or would that look weird. I'm tired of using the word "street" or “road” and it doesn't fit in with my other-worldly feel of my novel.

    Also i'd like to describe people's clothes in more detail, such as the type of material they wear, or the style, like the different types of collars or neckties, i'm tired of having every peasant wear a "tunic".

    Anyone know of any good resources??
     
  2. Pallas
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    Pallas Contributing Member Contributor

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    Well it is a fine line, you do not wan to get bogged down in too much detail. Sometimes simpler is better as you might describe only the quality of fabrics or the complexity or openness of a space. Someone probably has more specific resources, but checking your favorite books of this genre might be helpful.
     
  3. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    for clothes try museum replica and architecture read a good roman history book

    EDIT: Also create scrapbooks I use google images to create an image for my book if necessary I draw (I have 0 talent) what I need etc
     
  4. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Be careful of including too much description. Your readers have great imaginations - let them use them!
    :)
     
  5. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    the only ones you should consult are books by the best writers, to see how they do it!
     
  6. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    I have trouble with that as well. I went to an art gallery and took pictures of the ones of scenery. Then, I brainstormed as I stared at the pictures.
     
  7. Lothgar
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    Lothgar Contributing Member

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    Plaza is a Spanish word related to "field" which describes an open urban public space, such as a city square, market square or court yard.

    A balustrade is a row of repeating balusters - small posts that support the upper rail of a railing. Staircases and porches often have balustrades.

    For Architecture definitions, explanations and images of the pieces, I'd suggest using www.google.com. The internet has a wealth of information that you might find useful.

    Some words you may wish to look up are Arch, Archway, Dias, Column, Capital (Top of a column), Plinth, Statuary, niche, portcullis, Finial, Balcony, Solarium, fountain, bas relief, Buttress, etc. The google image search can provide you with photo images of these pieces to illustrate exactly how they fit together and allow you to write more detailed descriptions.
     

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