1. DomTheDoxx
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    DomTheDoxx Member

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    Dwindling Passion?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by DomTheDoxx, Jul 21, 2012.

    Have any of you ever started writing a novel/book/short story/whatever and been REALLY into it, then somewhere along the path of writing, it gets less interesting and your passion starts to fade?

    I remember when i first started writing, i would imagine each scene in detail and FEEL what the characters were feeling so hard, but i took a break for a week or two from writing, and when i came back i wrote a chapter and it felt... lacking. I didn't really enjoy writing it as much as i had before and i felt i put a lot less detail that i had before. Although, with my previous chapters i would revise them almost immediately after writing them, and with this last chapter i wrote, i just blazed through it without looking back (because of some advice i read which said "write the entire first draft, then go back for revision when its finished").


    ANYWAYS, what i'm asking is. Has this happened to any of you? How did you deal with it if you have gone through this?
     
  2. GoldenGhost
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    GoldenGhost Contributing Member

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    Many times an intial spark of an idea fueled a story of mine. Upon returning after a break, I felt completely uninterested, and as I progressed the writing, the words simple, drab, and painstakingly forced. I attribute this feeling to a couple reasons dealing with my perception: my ability to create a false emotional experience, or that the story itself lacked any interesting quality, that I was unaware of in the beginning. For me, the latter is usually the case.

    As a friend of mine says, "This is the journey of a writer." And his words could not be more true. Writing is surely a roller coaster, with twists and turns, and ups and downs, whose turbulance can translate into our human experience. Sometimes the air peels back your lips, and you're screaming those screams of joy that only roller coasters bring about, and in the next instant frowning so hard your lips reach your lap, because the person in front of you vomitted.

    In my opinion, in regards to both writing, and the human experience, life is struggle, and struggle becomes value. Value transforms into beauty, and beauty is life. If you press on through these dark periods, mustering up your courage to face the page and continue, however forced the words may seem, or hollow they may sound, the end result will define you as a writer, and those are the moments that make us who we are.

    So, my advice is to press on, with the understanding that you may have to trash the piece, anyway. Even though the words lost their spark, you've made kindling for your next fire.
     
  3. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    It happens to me, and I'm sure it happens to all writers. A famous example is Kafka. The majority of his works are incomplete, and I'm fairly certain this has something to do with dwindling passion.

    My advice is to take a break from the story/novel/poem that you've lost passion for and work on another story/novel/poem.
     
  4. psychotick
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    psychotick Contributing Member Contributor

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    Hi,

    All the time. I have probably sixty odd novels in various stages of completion because of it. They vary between a few k and in some cases over a hundred k. What usually happens to me is that I get inspired, I write, and then something else comes along and I change horses.

    Cheers, Greg.
     
  5. tinyplanets
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    tinyplanets Member

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    I find that my state of mind has a good deal of influence on my motivation to write. When I am completely relaxed and contented I loss the drive to put my fingers to the keyboard. For me writing is a way of organising my thoughts, if that makes sense. The more stressed and insecure I feel, the more likely I am to write.
     
  6. Makeshift
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    Makeshift Active Member

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    For me this happens a lot and sometimes it lasts for months. Sometimes I wonder if I really am a writer. In a way this is like a hobby and sometimes you just get bored with it and find another hobby. I'm still young and searching, so maybe this whole writing thing is just a phase and I'll have no interest in it two years from now. In general I only attempt to write stories where I can think of the ending before typing a single word. That is a pretty good method at preventing "useless" writing, e.g. stories that seem interesting at one point, but end up going nowhere. The more you can map out the plot in your head before writing, the more likely you're to succeed. When I began writing, I attempted too much too soon. My first short story was something that spiraled out of control, started out simple and grew so large and complicated that I simply gave up, so perhaps the answer could lie in writing shorter pieces.
     
  7. MeganHeld
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    MeganHeld Senior Member

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    All the time. It is disheartening when this happens because the passion you had when you first started writing is no longer there. This is what happens to most writers. You just have to work through it. Sometimes, sitting down and making yourself write the novel again will bring back the spark and your interest. I am assuming you have left it alone for some time now, which breaks are good when this happens too. As long as you sit down and try to write again, you will be fine. Sparks come and go. You need such a spark to start the novel or else there would be no interest in writing it. Keep with it. Do not give up faith on the book.
     
  8. shadowwalker
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    shadowwalker Contributing Member Contributor

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    This is why I always say passion is over-rated. Yes, writing can be exhilarating, it can be exciting - but it's also boring and sweaty and frustrating and infuriating. If all you have going for you is a 'passion for writing', your career will no doubt be short. If you accept that it means working your butt off even when you don't feel like it, then you stand a chance.
     
  9. Morkonan
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    Morkonan Senior Member

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    Get passionate about the story and this won't happen as often. (It will still happen, though. It happens to everyone.) But, if you're only worked up about a particular series of scenes and characters, you might find yourself treading water halfway through the book. Find a way to inspire yourself to get passionate about the entire story. Dig through it. Rustle your notes around and look for highlights that drew you to the story in the first place. Picture the scenes you haven't written and, for the boring ones, stop making them boring! If they're boring to write, they'll be boring to read. So, make them not-boring. If you've lost interest in the characters, chances are that the reader will as well. If you've lost interest in the plot, chances are the reader will too. If there are subplots that you're just not very excited about, yank them out of the book! Why? Guess...

    If that doesn't work, consider parsing your story down to a novelette or short story. Cut out the stuff that isn't interesting, remove the fluff that bores you, sanitize the story so that it is "boredom" and "mundane" free in its finished form. You'll probably find it's a heck of a lot more fun to write, that way.

    If those don't work, start writing something else. Gather your notes together, backup your files, dump it all in a storage directory under "Unfinished" and then stare at a fresh piece of paper or a new screen and think up another story. Write fresh and don't dwell on the unfinished work. Just leave it behind, for now. Later, when you're tidying up your workspace, you might want to revisit it in order to see if you can spark some new passion for finishing it.
     
  10. Thumpalumpacus
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    Thumpalumpacus Contributing Member

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    I don't have a hell of a lot of experience finishing a novel, but when sag comes in any creative work, I might take a break from the point I'm currently at and approach it from a different standpoint -- one that might not make the final draft, or even be intended to do so. The idea is to turn the diorama in my hands a little for a fresh and interesting view.
     

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