1. sprirj
    Offline

    sprirj Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    158

    Ending your opening action scene

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by sprirj, May 12, 2015.

    So I've written my dramatic opening scene, and now I just need to tie up loose ends and move on. However, I'm finding that this lacks conflict, and is becoming dull to write and boring to read. Are there any tips for this stage of writing?

    Setting scene.
    My MC has overcome an event, and knows his next goal, he has met someone who he doesn't trust, but who can help him. He now needs to move on and travel to next scene. I'm not sure if the additional character should come with him, or just to move on. I do need to write about the transportation from one place to another, but afraid it has no hook.
     
  2. EdFromNY
    Offline

    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    4,684
    Likes Received:
    2,534
    Location:
    Queens, NY
    Assuming you are writing a novel, not every scene needs to have a hook or an active conflict. Readers understand there are sections in which you get your house in order and will generally give you time to do that. Perhaps your MC, in moving to his new place, can be pondering why he doesn't trust the person who can help him. Let the reader know the internal conflict.
     
    KaTrian likes this.
  3. KaTrian
    Offline

    KaTrian A foolish little beast. Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 17, 2013
    Messages:
    5,566
    Likes Received:
    3,563
    Location:
    The Great Swamp
    If this is really necessary, I think Ed just gave you some solid advice. Use the scene to lay the foundation for a potential future conflict with the new guy. Show your MC's distrust and fears. It'd be interesting to find out how things will unfold from there on in once you've shown this guy/gal can't be trusted. You can use the character to also show something new and intriguing about your MC. If you paint a picture of a potentially intriguing relationship, that'd also make your reader to read on. Will these two end up fighting at some point? Who will win? What then? Or how will the new guy betray the MC -- or will s/he? And so on.

    If s/he doesn't come along, you can use the scene to e.g. mislead your reader about the upcoming thing your MC is planning to do. Or maybe he plans his next step and then things go the opposite way in the next scene.
     
  4. sprirj
    Offline

    sprirj Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2009
    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    158
    Thank you, that really helps. I like the idea of following external conflict with internal. I'm still a little unsure, but I can give it ago
     

Share This Page