1. Garball
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    Garball Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand. Supporter Contributor

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    Enough is enough

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Garball, May 10, 2013.

    At some point, do you just have to label your work complete? I keep rereading my MS and thinking I could say this or do this or describe this. It seems like that could go on forever. Does having those feelings indicate your story is not complete, or is there a point where enough is enough?
     
  2. Gallowglass
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    Gallowglass Contributing Member Contributor

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    Endless 'correcting' is just another form of procrastination that delays the finished product. Read it through: if there's no glaring faults after a successive rounds of thorough editing, then you should consider sending it off to publishers. Let their feedback be your guide from here on out: they will tell you if there's anything more that needs improving.
     
  3. Garball
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    Garball Sometimes nothing can be a real cool hand. Supporter Contributor

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    If a publisher or agent sees potential in your work, will they give you feedback and help you out? I was under the impression it was a cut and dry yes or no.
     
  4. jeepea
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    jeepea Member

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    I think it was Faulker who said he never completed a work, he just abandon it. At some point you have to say you've done your best and send the thing out. And believe me, even if it is accepted and published, when you read it later, you'll still find errors and wish you could correct them.

    I don't think you will get much input from publishers or agents if they reject your work. They don't have time to critique a work that doesn't suit their needs as is. There are probably exceptions, but very few.
     
  5. Nee
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    Nee Contributing Member

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    This tendency to rework a piece til it either kills you or you kill it, is why I adopted the always "Edit before doing a Revision" rule. Because most of the time when you feel you could make a particular segment of writing better it means you probably need to cut down rather than add to.
     
  6. TerraIncognita
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    TerraIncognita Aggressively Nice Person Contributor

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    I agree with this.

    It's very difficult for me to put something down and to say it's finished. This is something that extends into all art forms I enjoy. It comes with being a perfectionist. Sometimes the drive to make something better can be good and sometimes it can take over and ruin a work that was great how it was. I'd suggest taking a break from it and coming back to it with fresh eyes. That helps clear things up for me and I've heard a lot of people say it works well for them too. :)
     
  7. Krishan
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    Krishan Active Member

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    Some agents (most good ones) will help you edit a piece to make it the best it can be. Naturally they will only do this if you are their client. If they decline to represent your work, they usually won't provide in-depth feedback.

    All good publishers should arrange for your work (if accepted) to be looked at by an editor. I would be worried if a publisher wanted to put out a book without making any changes to the manuscript whatsoever.
     

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