1. Joran Selemis
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    Joran Selemis Member

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    Exotic POVs

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Joran Selemis, Nov 3, 2009.

    So for the most recent story I'm writing, I decided to start off with an omniscient paragraph from a kind of narrator which describes the events of a story. In this instance, he describes how there are no monsters in the dark but for the ones our mind imagines, and then after the first paragraph the POV shifts to a monster who has just been born in the darkness. It's never elaborated on how the monster came to exist; it simply did. And I'm finding it incredibly difficult writing from this perspective, mostly because it's difficult to couple the monster's physically distressing and terrifying features with his child-like, naive and inquisitive attitude.

    So basically, I was just wondering what's the strangest POV you've ever written from, and how did you get around the problems you faced with it?
     
  2. John Carlo
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    John Carlo Active Member

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    Recently, I've written a short story (which I think I will post soon), where I go from third person omniscient to first person by the end of the story. It was all about giving the transition cue to prepare the reader. I think it came out pretty clear because of the transition, but again, I haven't posted it yet so we shall see what the comments will be.
    For your story, it seems the terrifying aspect of the monster will have to be put on hold when your speaking with his voice. This is mainly because it sounds like the monster doesn't much feel like a monster at heart. When you go back to an outsider's POV, you can implement the terror as they would have no idea what's going on in the monster's head. As far as switching POV's - I've only just started experimenting but have found that it's all about ending one paragraph with a certain POV with a transition cue that will make switching it close to seamless. And by transition cue, I mean saying something like, "God only knows what goes on in the mind of a monster." or "Looking into the monster's eyes, he saw nothing but hunger." These are corny, but you get the idea. A sentence like one of these would make the reader accept the change more readily.
     
  3. Joran Selemis
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    Joran Selemis Member

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    You're right about POV switching; it's definitely got to have a sort of summing up line at the end of it. But in my story the POV never switches, it always remains on the monster except for the opening paragraph. I figured I would use really painful-sounding words and descriptions like 'looking at his enormous claws built for rending and evisceration, the monster saw a chance to touch someone, to feel warmth beneath his elongated and abnormal fingers' to show the contrast between his appearance and his psyche.
     

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