1. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    Fantasy terms...

    Discussion in 'Setting Development' started by jwatson, Aug 25, 2009.

    In my novel set in an older version of the earth...medieval-ish setting:
    wouldn't it be weird to call a girl that my main character is in love with his "girlfriend?" They are not married. It just doesn't seem to fit with the story. I'm wondering if there is an alternative way of addressing their relationship. Rather than: The woman he loves.
    Any other terms I could use describing their relationship?
    Thanks
     
  2. Rumpole40k
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    Rumpole40k Banned

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    His lady?
     
  3. Birdie
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    Birdie New Member

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    Lover, lady friend, beloved.

    All three have a Middle English origin or earlier.
     
  4. bluebell80
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    bluebell80 Contributing Member

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    I think beloved sounds the best, doesn't imply being overly intimate like lover does.
     
  5. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    What about...beloved partner?

    "David lived with his beloved partner, Sally Hayes." <--- is that alright?
     
  6. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    Partner sounds so...legal. Very 21st century, no?
     
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    99% terms like beloved partner will be either very cheesy or way too formal or fancy.
     
  8. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    haha
    what if I just simply did the "girlfriend" ? I don't have a problem with that but I don't want the readers to be like "that's what they called them back then?"
     
  9. Gallowglass
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    Gallowglass Contributing Member Contributor

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    That is what they were called back then. At least that's the translation of the old (and sometimes modern) Gaelic word for it. I don't know about England, or other parts of Europe, but I'm assuming it was the same there, as well.

    Other than that, then the third option would be your best bet. That's been used in English poetry for hundreds of years, so it existed back then, and would have been familiar to at least some of the population.

    It depends on where in the medieval world you're basing your story's technology and events, and how much you want to base it on that.
     
  10. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    His lady, his paramour, sweet Eleanor (assuming that is her name), fair Eleanor...
     
  11. Banzai
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    Banzai One-time Mod, but on the road to recovery Contributor

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    Sweetheart?
     
  12. jwatson
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    jwatson Active Member

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    Thanks, I'll probably go with His Lady or Girlfriend. Either should do the trick, I've the dialogue quite up to date, after all, despite the setting.
     

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