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  1. zelda
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    zelda Member

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    Format for thought dialogue, what's your choice?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by zelda, Sep 29, 2010.

    Hi! I took the advice I read of keeping my characters' thoughts like normal text and saying "he thought" etc. But I don't like it...

    Do any of you use italics? Do you use italics as well as saying "he thought" etc.?
    Do you use quotation followed by "he thought" (without quotations of course) ?

    Anyone have any info about which is most successful in selling novels, with editors, etc.?
     
  2. Wreybies
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    Wreybies The Ops Pops Operations Manager Staff Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    Italics in this case is a no-no for a manuscript. It's not about preference, it's about putting your work out there in the manner that the industry expects.
     
  3. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Exactly. Italics are not a general-purpos text decoration you can use whenever you with text to "look different." Italics has specific purposes, which include:

    • Placing emphasis on a word or phrase within a sentence which ordinarily would not receive the stress.
    • Indicating foreign words and phrases within the text, like ipso facto.
    • Marking the titles of creative works, for example a movie title like Gone With the Wind, a book title like Tolstoy's War and Peace, or a painting like Mother by Whistler. Italics are not used for titles of persons like the King of England, city nicknames like the City of Brotherly Love, or architectural features like the Golden Gate Bridge.

    Dialogue, spoken or unspoken is not one of those uses.

    This is a worn out debate that has been shouted out in many prior threads.
     
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