?

I would recommend...

  1. saving it for at least 10 years.

    0 vote(s)
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  2. saving it for x years

    0 vote(s)
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  3. diving in now.

    4 vote(s)
    100.0%
  1. Ms. DiAnonyma
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    Ms. DiAnonyma Active Member

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    Freezing for Later...

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Ms. DiAnonyma, May 20, 2015.

    I was just loooking for some opinions on whether or not to store an idea for later... The principle reason is I think I'm not ready for the story and it's theme, and I want to do it justice (or at least something closer to what it deserves) when I'm older, and have more experience (writing and otherwise).

    Have any of you ever done this? Did you regret not plunging into an idea right away? Or was it much easier starting with a clean slate later? I'm not concerned about not having anything else to write about at the time being, (have planty of plates for the burners), but just whether this particular idea should sit.

    The story is about a girl, (happens to be about my current age), who lives in a world where all painful memories are regularly erased (maybe monthly; it's not so difficult as it sounds, as the populatoin has been significantly reduced after what seemed like the end of the world). She slips through the system once, and finally becomes aware of what's going on. She's disturbed by it, though unable to identify the value of suffering yet, so when she comes across some "underground" people who've never had any of their memories erased, she tries to help them overthrow the system. Eventually she does learn the value of suffering, confronts the fellow who set up the whole Memory Removal system- but I'm unsure whether she's actually successful in her attempt or not...

    On the one hand, writing now might help writing about the MC (or maybe not?). But the whole theme of suffering and its value feels very touchy, and something I've got no authority whatsoever to work with.

    Of course, if this sounds ways too unoriginal/similar to something you know of, please let me know!

    Thank you so much for your time and consideration!
     
  2. BookLover
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    BookLover Contributing Member

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    It sounds a little like The Giver, but not exactly.

    I say dive right in. :)
     
  3. 123456789
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    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

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    For a minute there I thought you were going to say something interesting, like, she's disturbed by it, though unable to identify the value of suffering, and just as she's about to realize why, they erase her memory. And this happens again and again and of course the ending would be tragic- instead , this is basically just another cliche rebel-against-dystopian-society type story. In think the theme is good, but the delivery has is a little trite for me.
     
    Last edited: May 20, 2015
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  4. uncephalized
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    uncephalized Active Member

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    The Giver, mixed with Equilibrium.

    Seconded, dive right in and see what you can do with it. Ideas are not so precious they need to be hoarded.
     
  5. Selbbin
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    Selbbin I hate you Contributor

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    Dive in. You'll get better ideas as you develop as a writer anyway.

    And yeah, is very Equilibrium. ;)
     
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  6. Mckk
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    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I've never understood the concept of "waiting till I can do it justice". How exactly do you think you'll ever develop the skills to "do it justice" if you never write? You need to write in order to perfect your skills, and every story will need different things. Stories aren't things that pop out ready and perfect - it takes time to edit, rewrite, and polish it up. This means, the first time you write it will never do it justice - it's the process of editing that eventually perfects it. But if you don't write, there's nothing to perfect! The rough draft is just that - rough. And rough is not doing any story justice, but you cannot have a perfect product without first creating the rough version. Does it mean you just never write?

    So yes, echoing everyone else, dive straight in!

    Incidentally I really like your concept :D
     
  7. Christine Ralston
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    Christine Ralston Active Member

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    I just finished the final revisions on my science fiction novel. I had the idea many years ago, but was not ready to write it back then. Gaining experience makes a huge difference and if you feel that experience will help you write it better later, then that may be the best choice for you. In my opinion, people who become successful at writing are the ones who realize that they have a lot of writing and rewriting, personal growth, and research ahead of them.
     
  8. Ms. DiAnonyma
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    Ms. DiAnonyma Active Member

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    Thank you all for your helpful comments!

    @123456789: Well, I've thought of that, but like I said, I'm hardly certain of the ending... I guess you'll just have to wait in suspense :)
    And, yes, I figured if it had some potential in the dryest, boringest form, then it'd be nice to know.
    The resemblance to other utopian/dystopian stories is of course most recognizable; I'm not familiar with Equilibrium, but will look into that...

    I suppose the chief difference is the selection of only painful memories... In The Giver, the reader doesn't feel like disputing the wrongness of the wholesale memory removal- it takes all the good things out of life as well as the bad. Equilibrium looks like it's just advocating emotion in general, which most people would indentify as part of what makes us human as opposed to animal. (Though, looking at it's plot summ., my MC seems a) way less cool b) way weaker c) less capable and independent d) and maybe not as successful (at the very least, not so much on her own.) I guess I'm mostly concerned that I will be able to really get across the part about pain and suffering, not just as parts of a person's identity, but as necessary and redeeming forces...

    @Mckk:
    Thank you for your positive response! Actually, that I won't be writing is not a problem at all; I've got multiple other stories (some short, some long, and some in between) to work on in the meantime. (The three that are on here all definitely will take plenty of work and time, at least). And I don't generally think I need to save/hoard ideas for later. It's just that this one felt like I'd be likely to totally trample over now, and I'm a little concerned it will be easier to start later without having to erase all the clumsy bootmarks. The issue of maybe having a better perspective for the MC now is weighing on the other side, but is probably of secondary (if not less) importance.

    @Christine Ralston:
    Thank you, that kind of sounds like what I was thinking... How long did you wait? Were you researching for it off and on, or did you just know when you were ready?
     
  9. sprirj
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    sprirj Contributing Member

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    Write now. Plan and outline as you go. Keep a notebook with you at all times. If you don't 'write' at least 'think' about the story every day. In 10 years time you can use your experience and edit it or write something better. Putting something off doesn't achieve anything.
     
  10. B93
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    B93 Active Member

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    >just another cliche rebel-against-dystopian-society type story

    So what? There are only so many basic plots and settings and everything is just another something-or-other type story. You have a twist in the selective erasure, and potential to give it an underlying moral viewpoint. Go for it.

    Whether you write this one or something else, your writing will improve with practice and critique.
     
  11. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    I'm with the people who say 'go for it.' Yes, I agree that maturity will add stuff to the mix that might not be there in a young writer. But young writers don't need to wait till they get old to start. Their writing will mature along with them. If the story idea intrigues you, give yourself some time to think about it, to play around with it in your head, develop your characters to where you can see and hear them speak, watch them move, etc. Then by all means go ahead and write it.

    Fifty years from now, you can rewrite it, and see what the differences will be! Might be fun.
     
  12. EdFromNY
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    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

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    I don't often disagree with my good friend @jannert, but I'm going to here. I would hold off, particularly if you have other things you want to work on. Some stories take time to develop. I have a couple of projects I've started where I felt I had to dive right in, only to be disappointed when the output didn't somehow resolve itself in a harmonious whole. I will likely return to them at some point, after they've had some more time in the wine cellar of my imagination.

    You don't have to put it off for a specific period of time, but I'd at least invest a few good long walks (or whatever you do to allow yourself to reflect) in trying to think the thing through.

    Good luck, no matter what you decide to do.
     
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  13. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    I agree with you @EdFromNY , about letting a story 'cook' for a while before starting to write it. But unless I picked it up wrongly, I think the OP was thinking about waiting till she got 'older.' I assumed she meant she didn't feel she was mature enough to write it just now. I think that's different from allowing a story time to develop. There is a difference between allowing a story to mature, and waiting till you, the writer, are mature.
     
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  14. EdFromNY
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    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

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    I don't know. I think maybe they go hand in hand.
     
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  15. peachalulu
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    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

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    I think it depends on how seriously you want to treat the subject /concept. I have one book right now that I've wrote about four or five drafts and I've since put it on hold because I don't think I'm doing the subject justice. Scratch that, I know I'm not doing the subject justice. But it's not a genre type novel, I'm aiming for literary. As far as I'm concerned that takes living and timing.

    Genre is a bit more forgiving because the emphasis is on plot and excitement. How far deep you want to go on the subject is up to you.
     
  16. nhope
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    nhope Contributing Member Reviewer

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    You'll never be done learning. You know stuff now, you'll know new stuff next month, in 3 years, in 20 years. Life molds and changes you and your perspective.

    What makes writing have purpose is the discovery of one's self as the story progresses. You will learn more about your truth and your ability by writing that which you never thought you could.

    So just write it down.
     

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