1. New_to_Ya
    Offline

    New_to_Ya New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 6, 2015
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    0

    Giving my character a job

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by New_to_Ya, Jan 8, 2015.

    I want to provide a character's job. What is the policy if I wanted to give his place of employment a name? Would it matter if I mentioned a popular company or just made one up? Would I be better off just saying what he did and leave it at that?
     
  2. Shadowfax
    Offline

    Shadowfax Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Aug 27, 2014
    Messages:
    2,504
    Likes Received:
    1,337
    As I recall, James Bond worked for "International Import/Export", a vague name that Ian Fleming just made up, which is probably the safest course, especially bearing in mind the litigiousness of corporations nowadays. However, Cat Stevens took the name for "Matthew and Son" from his tailor, and doesn't appear to have got sued.

    Why do you need to mention where he works?

    I'd suggest sticking with "He was an accountant who worked for a large/small/medium firm in the city."
     
  3. HelloImRex
    Offline

    HelloImRex Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jan 26, 2014
    Messages:
    267
    Likes Received:
    172
    If he works for a government agency, I'm pretty sure you can use those as real names. How many TV shows and books have main characters working in the FBI, police, military, CDC, you get the point...I'm from America.
     
  4. TWErvin2
    Offline

    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2006
    Messages:
    2,528
    Likes Received:
    561
    Location:
    Ohio, USA
    You could to the route: "Shop smart. Shop S-Mart." :)
     
  5. Glasswindows
    Offline

    Glasswindows Member

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    3
    If it's a very general name, I don't think it matters. You can search it in google to make sure it's alright. Not necessarily whether someone has one but also to make sure what it is, or where. Or you might end up using something ridiculous when thought in real life. But still I too would go with "a major corporation (doing what........)", no need for a name.
     
  6. LorenaTralala
    Offline

    LorenaTralala Member

    Joined:
    Jan 9, 2015
    Messages:
    37
    Likes Received:
    3
    Location:
    Lawrence, KS
    "trademark infringement" is the unauthorized use of a name in a way that creates a likelihood of confusion as to the origin of the goods or services.
    "Trademark dilution" owners of famous brand names have legal right to prohibit others from using those names in a manner that would make them less "distinctive," less able to identify and distinguish the owners' goods or services.
    Trademark "tarnishment" is a kind of hybrid between trademark dilution and defamation. Such claims arise when a non-owner uses another's trademark in highly disparaging or offensive contexts.
    A sensible precaution: if you are depicting brand name products or companies in an unsavory light in your novel or short story, it is often prudent to invent a fictional brand or a fictional company. If there is a compelling artistic reason to use real products and real companies in contexts that arguably disparage them, it is wise to seek advice, prior to publication, from your publisher's attorney -- or an attorney of your own -- on how best to minimize the legal risks."
    -From, Rights of Writers, on blogger.com

    Hopefully this helps :)
     
    Shadowfax likes this.

Share This Page