1. zaneoriginal
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    zaneoriginal Member

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    Going from telling a good story to writing a good story.

    Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by zaneoriginal, Aug 24, 2014.

    I know from a lot of experiences that I can tell fun and interesting stories, especially when they relate to some intense past life or work experience, but this is often in face to face verbal settings. I find putting an interesting story into writing and keeping the reader interested or not confused to be a bit more challenging. This in contrast to me finding it a lot better to put into writing a serious or technical matter than trying to explain it verbally.

    Are there methods for developing one's abilities to put an interesting story into a written format?

    By methods I'm mean something like practices, books to read or really anything to do to improve this. I've noticed at least a few distinct approaches to how to write an interesting story here that differ from how one would simply speak it.

    I hope this question isn't too vague.
     
  2. cazann34
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    cazann34 Active Member

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    I think you mean you're looking for techniques to find your writing voice. Am I right? In my view a writing voice and the one you use to tell stories face to face aren't always the same thing. Sometimes we invent a character to tell the story. We may pick a man when we are a woman or visa-versa or even a child to narrate.
    Finding that voice won't be easy. We need to know the narrator inside and out. We are telling the tale from their prospective as well as their prejudices towards the places and people in it.
    I'm not sure if that is any help please let me know.
     
  3. daemon
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    daemon Contributing Member Contributor

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    Begin by telling a story with your own human voice to another real live human being, while recording yourself. Transcribe what you said. Work from there.
     
  4. Empty Bird
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    Empty Bird Member

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    Read.

    Read and practise and then read again.

    Read. Haha! If you're fond of stories, I'm sure you already do!

    I know, it's a tricky situation, right? You can tell a brilliant story, people are hanging off of your every word, but then when it comes to sticking it all to paper, it's a tough matter.

    Trust me, I get it.

    I'm not an expert or anything, nor would I go to saying that there's ever such as a writer who is. More experienced, definitely, but writing is a continuous process. You grow and you change and you change and you grow. But anyway, I'm going off track.

    If you can tell a fantastic story, if you have a wonderful story, then sometimes, it doesn't matter if you're writing's not fabulous. I'm not encouraging anyone to slack off or anyything, it' simply that I've read books before where their writing hasn't been astonishing. The voice hasn't been that unique.

    But the story was so exciting, so intriguing that it tore me away from any of that.

    In fact, I didn't even notice the writing wasn't that special until I had to look at it deeper.

    So...you want to put pen to paper and not get the readers confused.

    First draft, first! First drafts are just meant to be bad. I don't think there's one first draft out there where the author's slammed the pile of papers onto the desk, leaned back with a self-satisfied smile and said: "Yup. Where's my publisher?"Nooo way. If you're a more tell-the-story-than-write-the-story person, then that's perfect! First drafts (in my humble opinion) are all about the story!

    The fiddly, finnicky bit of tryin to make it understandable comes from the editting process!

    Speaking and writing is kinda different but not, at the same time.

    All you're doing is pouring your words- or the words of your characters- onto paper.

    Tell me if this made no sense or was no help at all; I'll try and explain myself better.
     
  5. Link the Writer
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    Link the Writer Flipping Out For A Good Story. Contributor

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    This, basically. When you are telling someone a story through paper, it's not really you you're talking about, even if it were in first person. Unless it's a memoir, the story is about the main character and the struggle he/she goes through. What is their beliefs? Their morals? How do they view life? You'll find that some of them don't really believe what you believe.

    Ask yourself who they are, what they value. Ask yourself what is driving them to complete their quest, their motivations. Read a lot. Read and learn what drives the characters within.

    Also, as @Empty Bird said, the first draft is supposed to be bad, so don't flog yourself over every single word. The first draft is just getting the story out on paper. The edits and re-writes are what shapes the story into something to be sold.
     
  6. zaneoriginal
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    zaneoriginal Member

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    Thank you all for the replies.

    I was playing with trying different perspectives and tenses to find something that came naturally to me and was easy to read. Beyond that, I've also tried playing with how I say things. When trying first person I have been thinking a lot about the type of story and who the speaker is.
     

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