1. ohmyrichard
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    ohmyrichard Active Member

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    Halliday verb types

    Discussion in 'Word Mechanics' started by ohmyrichard, Jun 25, 2009.

    Hi,everyone.
    Would you please tell me how many types of verbs there are in English according to Halliday? Is there one type of verb called restrictive or restricted verbs? And what is its definition by Halliday?
    Thanks.
    Richard
     
  2. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    what's 'halliday'?
     
  3. ohmyrichard
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    ohmyrichard Active Member

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    Halliday is also a linguist or grammarian,Chomsky's buddy. Chomsky is one of the most influential linguists/ Grammarians who are still alive. Halliday has retired, but Chomsky seems not. Chomsky now works at MIT.
     
  4. Sound of Silence
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    Sound of Silence Member

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    :eek: Halliday is a functionlalist, that is, he analyses language as it's used in any given context. Chomsky deals with generative grammar (how language should be used as opposed to how it is used in reality, think rule book, you've just about got it). They differ hugely on theory and I'd love to get them in the same room and watch the sparks. Chomsky believes the aquisition of language is down purely to innateness, Halliday belives that, yep, while it does seem to suggest we're born with the capacity to aquire language, it's the enviroment that we're brought up in that also stimulates and influences how we learn something, ergo language shouldn't be studied in isolation, but in the context and diversity that it's produced. To Halliady, there's no such thing as bad or wrong English. It's Just English as it's used in context...

    Hmmm, restricted verb usually means a verb is restricted to appearing in a particular way (I think).

    If I remember rightly, Halliday's scheme classifies verbs as either being:

    Material verbs ' I ran' which deals with verbs relating to action. They mainly deal with 'actor and participant roles'

    Mental verbs 'I thought' which deals with, yep anything to do with feeling etc. They deal with Sensor and phenomenon roles (I think)

    There's verbal verbs: 'I said', which deals with any act of sepaking. That centres around sayer and ...I've forgotten the other one...

    And relational verbs: I am/is/are etc which deals with verbs that relate one sort of experience to another. They deal with experiencer and experienced roles. But these also split into other categories, which I can't remember off the top of my head.

    Look up Halliday's 'transitive analysis', it should run through them there. Or look up 'Halliday's processess and participants'.

    I'm a bit rusty...Sorry.
     

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