1. IvoWriter
    Offline

    IvoWriter Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    2

    Have you used a storyboard for a book?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by IvoWriter, Jun 2, 2014.

    I'm somewhat good at drawing. Do you think if you work out the story in your head and then draw it scene by scene it would be easier to write it?
    It would probably take a lot more work but would your work benefit
     
  2. EdFromNY
    Offline

    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    4,683
    Likes Received:
    2,534
    Location:
    Queens, NY
    Not for me. My drawing sucks.

    I think it also depends on what you are writing. My current project is a historical novel covering 500 years. Even if I could draw, I'd be Noah's age by the time I was ready to actually start writing.

    I've always thought that storyboards were more applicable for screenplays than novels. No?
     
  3. Motley
    Offline

    Motley Active Member

    Joined:
    Aug 12, 2010
    Messages:
    125
    Likes Received:
    20
    Location:
    USA
    Drawing each scene seems a bit like a waste of time to me, but I'm not graphically artistic at all. People note scenes on index cards and lay them out, which I suppose is a bit like a text storyboard. I'm not sure how drawing them would help really.
     
  4. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    no and no...
     
  5. IvoWriter
    Offline

    IvoWriter Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    2
    IDK. I don't see my ideas as vivid as other people in my head. It be easier if I had them on paper and then just describe what I have drawn. Of course I'm not talking about some High level graphic novel stuff. I mean simple drawings. I've never tried it to. I was wondering is it a good idea.
     
  6. Larissa Redeker
    Offline

    Larissa Redeker Active Member

    Joined:
    Feb 13, 2014
    Messages:
    131
    Likes Received:
    48
    Location:
    Dark elves lands
    It's depend on how quick you can draw the idea. I draw too, but I write the scenes like a screenplay, to work in them later. Basic action describing and dialogues. Drawing is to illustrate the book after :)
     
  7. jim79
    Offline

    jim79 Member

    Joined:
    Dec 20, 2012
    Messages:
    30
    Likes Received:
    6
    you could either do sketches or cheat a little bit and use stock photos to illustrate where you want to go
     
  8. obsidian_cicatrix
    Offline

    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    1,711
    Likes Received:
    1,453
    Location:
    Belfast, Northern Ireland
    Personally, I think it's a waste of time. Story boarding is used to transmit information from one film dept to another; the actors, cameramen, props, wardrobe, etc... it is NOT used for writing a story. In the case of graphic novels, you need to have some idea of story and pacing of scenes beforehand so as to know how to break up the panels effectively.

    You are a one man show. If you know what's in your head sufficiently to draw it, you should be able to write it. Books deal in words, why faff around with anything else?
     
    minstrel and EdFromNY like this.
  9. plothog
    Offline

    plothog Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    514
    Location:
    England
    I'd be wary about thinking of writing as describing a series of stills.
    If you describe most of the pictures on a storyboard it could make for a rather slow read.
    There might be the odd occasion where a character stops in awe and drinks in all the details of beautiful scenery or a beautiful person. - but most the time this isn't how people realistically think. - they'll probably be more worried about trying to accomplish whatever goal they're trying to achieve at the time.
    Most the time, you'll be throwing in the odd visual detail here and there as they become relevant to the action, but hopefully not whole pictures worth. (because according to the popular saying that's 1000 words)
    Also a lot of what we write can't really be drawn in a picture.
    A picture can't really capture a characters thoughts and feelings.
    And a lot of the time even when you are trying to write descriptively, the advice I've heard is to engage all 5 senses. You can't really draw smells, sounds etc.
     
  10. IvoWriter
    Offline

    IvoWriter Member

    Joined:
    May 25, 2014
    Messages:
    22
    Likes Received:
    2
    Why not? There are always the stink lines the flies :D
     
  11. EdFromNY
    Offline

    EdFromNY Hope to improve with age Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2010
    Messages:
    4,683
    Likes Received:
    2,534
    Location:
    Queens, NY
    This!

    This reminds of the thread not long ago about picturing your story as if it were a film. The problem is that you end up describing the film rather than immersing the reader in the story. Same thing here.

    Frankly, I don't see the advantage to the writer. Could it be that your real passion lies, not with writing but with some other medium?
     
    minstrel likes this.
  12. plothog
    Offline

    plothog Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2013
    Messages:
    639
    Likes Received:
    514
    Location:
    England
    Well I suppose you can draw on that things are emitting some sort of smell if you want to. ;)
    Though you can write about smells more accurately than you can draw them.

    I'm not sure that drawing gives you an advantage in any area except for describing visual details, which is a smaller proportion of writing than you might first think. - a lot of the time when people are reading they do see pictures in their heads, but a lot more has often been filled in by their own imaginations than they realise.
     
  13. minstrel
    Offline

    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 11, 2010
    Messages:
    8,723
    Likes Received:
    4,821
    Location:
    Near Los Angeles
    Storyboards are used by filmmakers to plan camera angles, actor positions, and so on. None of that is really relevant to a writer. Sure, there are times when you want to emphasize something that a filmmaker will use a camera angle for (such as a spy listening behind the drapes while a couple of enemy military officers talk about secret plans), but you can certainly do that in prose (by writing the scene from the spy's POV, for example). Or, in a scene in which a train is speeding along the tracks, the director can put the camera on a distant hill overlooking the tracks if he wants to emphasize the vastness of the empty landscape the train is moving through, or he could position the camera right beside the track, low to the ground, pointing at the oncoming train - this would make the train seem huge and would make the audience feel like it's charging right out of the screen at them. That's the director's creative choice. Once again, your job is to figure out how to do that with prose, not with pictures.

    In most cases, as well, you'd have to use many storyboard pictures per scene. This would involve a lot of drawing that wouldn't really solve any of the problems you face in actually writing your scenes in prose. Why you would do this is beyond me.

    I'd say storyboards are unnecessary time-wasters when it comes to writing novels.
     
  14. mammamaia
    Offline

    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

    Joined:
    Nov 21, 2006
    Messages:
    19,316
    Likes Received:
    1,014
    Location:
    Coquille, Oregon
    i don't even do it for the screenplays i write/rewrite...

    i'm not going to be the director and when writing spec scripts, it's best to leave all the set design/directing/acting up to those who get paid the big bucks to do it, avoid stepping on their toes, so all i need be concerned with is the written script...

    i see the scenes in my mind's eye as i write them, anyway, so there's no need to see them drawn...
     

Share This Page