1. KrystaK
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    KrystaK New Member

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    Having trouble completing a story

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by KrystaK, Jan 19, 2012.

    I've been working on a story for a log time. I continually get a muse rush, then write some of the story and then forget it for months on end...I've actually been doing that with this story for years.... Anyways, I try and write chronologically, but that can be very difficult and tedious...

    I'm trying this new thing now where I write what the idea in my head is and then when I'm satisfied that all the ideas are down I'm going to fill in the connecting parts.
    I'm sure other people have tried this, but does anyone find they have more success finishing stories this way rather than going from one event to the next in order?

    Are there any other ways I can get this story done? As I said, I've been at it for years and I would really like to read the finished product :p

    Anyways, thanks
     
  2. The Magnan
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    The Magnan Active Member

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    This use to happen to me all the time, what I do sometimes is write short pieces of writing relating to the story that may later be incorporated. I also write a plan for some chapters, I strayed away from it but it might help. You could read other books for inspiration if they relate to the topic your writing about.
     
  3. Hellchoseme
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    Hellchoseme Member

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    This kind of happend to me a couple of times. Anyway, do what The Magnan said.
    I tend to write chronologically but occaisionally I feel inspired to write future chapters write away. In such cases you shouldn't fight it. Just write it when you have it in your head.
    But finally what you need to do is revise and revise some more. Some people say it's a daunting task but to people who are incredibly passionate it isn't even a chore. But revising is the only way to make it perfect.
     
  4. Jake9000
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    Jake9000 New Member

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    I've also been trying a more nonlinear approach on my current project. I've found that writing whatever is in my head helps keep me from getting stuck, and it makes it easier to keep myself writing on a daily basis. There is almost always something you can work on if you approach it this way, and it helps me avoid frustration. There's a great potential for spontaneity but I'm not trapped by linear thinking.

    One negative thing about this approach is the potential for wasted time. You'll probably write entire scenes that don't end up making it into your book. You'll may come up with things that you think are going to be awesome, but then when you write them, you might find that they don't really fit at all, and it may even lead to writing a whole string of wasted scenes occasionally. I've basically made peace with this because even when something doesn't work out, the process of writing it helps me learn more about my characters and story.

    An outline just takes all the fun out of writing for me, and writing from the seat of the pants in a linear way doesn't seem to work either because I write myself into corners and get frustrated when I can't think of what should happen next. Writing in a non linear way seems to be a middle ground between the two. It's almost like an organic form of outlining for me.
     
  5. Hellchoseme
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    Hellchoseme Member

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    You've got a good state of mind. "Writing by the seat of your pants" is what I do but if I don't plan at all I often get to a point where I have no idea where it's heading, and therefore have to abandon the whole thing.
     
  6. Jake9000
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    Jake9000 New Member

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    Yeah, false starts have always been a big problem for me, especially with longer projects, and usually that's how it happens. I get off to a roaring start with something, and eventually run out of steam when I can't see how to resolve the situation I've created. This seems to be helping me avoid that pattern.

    With this approach, I may stay on a particular plot string for a while, and write a whole series of scenes related to it, but when I eventually get stuck, I'll just jump to something totally unrelated that might fit into another part of the story. Sometimes I won't write the scenes in a full-fledged way because there is a lot of going back and forth in order to make things fit together. In some cases, the scene might not be much more than a crude description of what is going to happen, almost like a scene in an outline, and then I'll go back constantly and make it more detailed over time until it turns into a real scene. During that process, it tends to change to fit in better with the scenes around it.

    The net effect (so far, although I've only been doing this for a fairly short time) is to give me something to do when I sit down. I can either continue a plot thread I've been focusing on, or work on fleshing out a scene that's still in its infancy, or let my imagination go wild and write something right off the top of my head for a different part of the book.
     
  7. Tesoro
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    Tesoro Contributing Member Contributor

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    I think this is perfectly possible whatever approach you have to it, not just in this case. I have written several scenes that I've taken out in revision and I don't consider them a waste of time because that is what happens in writing. You write, you realize it does or doesn't belong or is or isn't good enough and sometimes you rewrite. That is the norm, I'd say. I would be more suspicious if a writer didn't take away even one scene or didn't have to rewrite anything after the first draft. I think few of us get it right in the first draft. but you do learn as you go along and therefor even the scenes that doesn't end up in the final draft still served a purpose. you learned something about the craft, you got to know our characters etc.
     
  8. stvn
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    stvn New Member

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    I've tried it a couple of times but I found I ended up with a lot of little poems and flashes of story that didn't really integrate. On the plus side, a lot of the part I'd created were good on their own, and could have lead off to different things. But that wasn't the plan.
     
  9. TheWritingWriter
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    TheWritingWriter Senior Member

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    I created a similar thread to this one about finishing my novel. People gave me a lot of good advice and it proved very helpful.
    Perhaps it will help you, too. Click here to see the thread.

    Trying to write a little bit everyday, no matter what comes out or how bad/good it is, it helps. It gets me into the groove of progress. Later, when I have a chapter out, I edit, and I turn around what needs to be turned, and chop what needs to be chopped, and just have one big editing party & make everything flow together.
     
  10. Pea
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    Pea super pea!

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    Urgh, I have the same thing. I was finally nearing the end of my book's draft and then my motivation dropped to a standstill. It is not good at all. Thanks for everyone's posts here, they seem helpful.
     

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