1. Hawaii21
    Offline

    Hawaii21 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3

    Help with fee for magazine article please

    Discussion in 'Publisher Discussion' started by Hawaii21, Jul 7, 2014.

    Hoping to catch the eye of anyone that write freelance for mags / websites please.
    I have just discovered I have had an article I emailed to a magazine published, hooray! Much joy, etc. However... They have said 'thanks a lot, we'll send you a free copy' No mention of any fee. I thought, from google (so no extensive research), I would be sent a contract with terms and payment info, this has not happened.
    I sent the article in full, by email and did not mention a fee at this point - I thought that would be negotiated / sorted later. Was I wrong in this? I assume they have sniffed me out as a rookie, but it doesn't feel right. What are people's thoughts? I'm still delighted to be published, and can add it to my bio, but I am wondering what went wrong for next time, if there is a next time of course!
    Thanks so much.
     
    andrew smith likes this.
  2. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,892
    Location:
    Boston
    Did you check their submission guidelines to see if they pay in cash? Some places pay in copies because they can't afford to pay cash. That's perfectly normal.
     
    KhalieLa and andrew smith like this.
  3. Hawaii21
    Offline

    Hawaii21 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3
    Hi, thanks a lot for replying. I couldn't see anything on their website about submissions / payments other than an email for sending pieces in. I hadn't realised I might be paid in copies. It is a national magazine, albeit specialist.

    In your opinion, is it the done thing to publish something without first confirming that there will be no payment? Their response was basically, thank you, we've published it. I just want to check as I am a complete novice! Should I also have made it clear in the first contact email that I expected a fee, and should I have not sent the full article? By doing this was I giving permission to publish without any agreed terms?

    Thanks a lot for your help.
     
    andrew smith likes this.
  4. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,892
    Location:
    Boston
    Payment is usually mentioned in the submission guidelines, but it's not unusual for magazines to not mention it. The way I see it, the act of submitting something suggests that you accept their guidelines and give them consent to publish the piece. In the future, if payment isn't listed, you should contact them before submitting and ask what their policy on payment is. Or do a quick Google search to see if you can find the information that way.
     
    Fernando.C and andrew smith like this.
  5. chicagoliz
    Offline

    chicagoliz Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 30, 2012
    Messages:
    3,295
    Likes Received:
    815
    Location:
    Pennsylvania
    There are MANY magazines that do not pay for stories. I'd venture to guess that there are likely more that do not pay than there are that do. Usually the submission guidelines I've seen mention payment, if the magazine does pay. So I kind of assume that they do not pay unless they specifically mention that they do. I would also be surprised if any that do pay negotiated a fee independently with each other. Those sorts of things are usually decided in advance and are standardized (unless the payment is in conjunction with some sort of contest, with higher payouts for stories that win or place).
     
    andrew smith likes this.
  6. Hawaii21
    Offline

    Hawaii21 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 7, 2014
    Messages:
    3
    Likes Received:
    3
    Thank you both for your replies, very helpful. It turns out I completely missed a fairly big section on their website stating guidelines and that they pay for experienced writers. I am indeed a true rookie but will know for next time! I'm obviously still delighted to be published, and my bio will be included as well so all in all it's a good day! Thanks again.
     
    andrew smith likes this.
  7. Ryan M Pelton
    Offline

    Ryan M Pelton Member

    Joined:
    Jul 25, 2015
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    USA
    Don't jsut sent the entire write-up without negotiating with them. Also, go thoroughly through their norms.
     
  8. Mike Kobernus
    Offline

    Mike Kobernus Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2013
    Messages:
    301
    Likes Received:
    127
    Location:
    Norway
    Personally, unless you are a professional writer, I would be pleased with an article in a national forum. Who cares if they give you a few pennies per word? That is peanuts compared to the prestige of being published.

    If there is no agreement made, you can ask to withdraw your article, and I am sure they will remove it from their system.

    I would not do that, personally. Better to have your name 'out there' than enough cash to buy a six pack.
     
    GingerCoffee likes this.
  9. GingerCoffee
    Offline

    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2013
    Messages:
    17,605
    Likes Received:
    5,879
    Location:
    Ralph's side of the island.
    What @Mike Kobernus said. Good grief, take advantage of the bragging rights, build on that and consider it a lesson in negotiating the market place.
     
    Mike Kobernus and Inks like this.
  10. KhalieLa
    Offline

    KhalieLa It's not a lie, it's fiction. Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    United States
    I write for a magazine and depending on the quality of the article some authors only get paid in copies of the magazine.

    The one I write for has payment structure that is not printed in their submission guidelines, but basically, if it's a short article or just filler, you get three copies of the magazine and Steve's thanks. If you get to be the cover story, feature article, or spotlight, then yes, you get paid. But cover stories and feature articles are planned ahead of time so that each issue has a specific "flavor." The editor will have a list of authors in mind to write those and there are deadlines that must be met.

    My advice is continue to submit. The magazine obviously liked your work and if you continue to improve you may end up on their short list for being asked to write a spotlight or featured article. And those typically come with pay, though not all magazines pay as was mentioned above.
     
    GingerCoffee likes this.
  11. Justin Rocket 2
    Offline

    Justin Rocket 2 Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Jun 13, 2013
    Messages:
    1,034
    Likes Received:
    194
    Getting published, even if in just copy, moves you down the road. Technically, it makes you "an experienced writer." That's good, right?
     
    GingerCoffee and Mike Kobernus like this.
  12. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,892
    Location:
    Boston
    While getting paid in copies is still considered paid experience, I highly recommend starting at the top (highest paying, most prestigious market) and working your way down. That way, you're not selling yourself short.

    For a list of markets, check out Poets&Writers (free) or Duotrope ($50/year but has more features).
     
    Raven484 likes this.
  13. KhalieLa
    Offline

    KhalieLa It's not a lie, it's fiction. Contributor

    Joined:
    Sep 11, 2015
    Messages:
    669
    Likes Received:
    390
    Location:
    United States
    There is nothing wrong with starting at the top and not selling yourself short, but there is also something to be said for enjoyment in writing. I don't think anyone should try to force themselves into writing something for a "more prestigious" publication if it's not the kind of thing they typically write.

    I believe a person should write the things they would like to read. I think it's helpful to ask yourself, "Would I subscribe to this magazine?" before attempting to submit an article. If you like the outdoors, spend a good deal of time hiking through designated wilderness areas, and tend to write nature related non-fiction, then something like Backcounty Magazine might be a better choice than some highly prestigious literary magazine you've never heard of. And as I perused the link, magazines like Backcountry, Backpacker, Nature Conservancy, etc, didn't even make the list.
     
  14. thirdwind
    Offline

    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2008
    Messages:
    7,351
    Likes Received:
    2,892
    Location:
    Boston
    I agree that looking for a good fit is important, and that was implied in my previous post. I'm certainly not saying you should force yourself to write for a particular market. What I meant to say was that once you've polished your manuscript and narrowed down the list of potential markets, start at the top of that list and work your way down.
     
    KhalieLa likes this.
  15. Sack-a-Doo!
    Offline

    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jun 7, 2015
    Messages:
    2,231
    Likes Received:
    1,511
    Location:
    [unspecified]
    On the bright side (if I may be so bold) you could sign the copy they send and after you become a famous and wealthy writer, sell it on eBay. I believe that constitutes delayed gratification, but better late than never, right? :)
     
  16. Steerpike
    Offline

    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    11,097
    Likes Received:
    5,310
    Location:
    California, US
    If the publisher is monetizing this in any way but not paying the writers, you should avoid it except in very limited circumstances.
     
  17. 123456789
    Offline

    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Jan 28, 2012
    Messages:
    6,347
    Likes Received:
    3,092
    This was years ago...
     
  18. matwoolf
    Offline

    matwoolf Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2012
    Messages:
    2,309
    Likes Received:
    2,239
    Location:
    Brighton Heights
    Carry on, I'm all ears.
     

Share This Page