1. JetBlackGT
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    JetBlackGT Contributing Member

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    How did your life change after you started writing?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by JetBlackGT, Mar 24, 2014.

    Did you feel like writing changed *you*?

    Did you feel like you became the you which you were supposed to be all along?

    If you had emotional ups and downs, did writing settle them or did they get worse?
     
  2. vera2014
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    vera2014 Contributing Member

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    I started seeing typos everywhere, on everything--they were even on the warranty that came with my e-reader. I couldn't escape from them! Eventually, I got fined $500 for writing proof reader marks all over a posh menu at a local restaurant. Just kidding. I'm more of a reader than a writer so I can't answer this post yet.
     
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  3. Albirich
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    Albirich Active Member

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    I think my life led me to writing. I've always loved history, and games, especially the story of the video games. I think if I were born in the 60s or something like that, I would seek the story not from games, but from books. So yeah, it's a new world and I don't think books are the first thing most kids think of when they seek fantasy, adventure or action.

    Writing is me. I'll write till I die. It has changed me incredibly!
     
  4. minstrel
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    minstrel Leader of the Insquirrelgency Staff Supporter Contributor

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    Writing definitely changed me. The first draft of my first novel was an acid test for me, and I failed. I wasn't the person I wanted to be, and writing the book clarified that. I had been too concerned with protecting my ego, too narrow, too closed to other people, and maybe just a little too afraid of what people might think of me if they saw past the crust.

    One of my main characters in the book is a very open-hearted young boy, and I admired him a lot, because he wasn't much like me. He had virtues I didn't. I think writing the book built a little more of him into my soul, and I'm the better for it.

    One of these days I have to get back to that book and finish his story. :)
     
  5. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    I'd say writing has changed me in some ways.

    I'm a lot less concerned about what other people—even close friends and family—think of me. They assumed a lot about the way I see the world, and they were wrong. Some of what I wrote shocked people who know me. Well ...in my opinion, they now know me better! None of these people have dumped me, though. And a few (whom I'd wrongly assumed would not like what I wrote surprised ME. They 'got' what I'd done, and responded in a very positive way. Assumptions were broken on both sides of the writing desk.

    I also had no idea that writing itself would provide such a huge buzz, and such a 'rush' when I finally finished my first draft of my novel. I could hardly believe I'd 'done it.' But I had. My characters, people who only lived inside my head till then, are now as alive as any other fictional characters ever were.

    Lots and lots to learn about perfecting the thing, and I'm still working on that aspect, but the feeling of 'having written' is something that has changed the way I see myself.

    It did change certain aspects of my social life, though. I now find most obligatory social activities intrusive. I do want to keep my friends because I'm not a recluse, but ...I'd rather be writing!
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
  6. 123456789
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    123456789 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Quite a statement, there:D.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014
  7. Mckk
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    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

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    I used to analyse whether the writing was good or bad whenever I read anyway, but after starting my novel, I started anaylsying devices and purposes of a certain thing happening and plot. Not sure I'd say that's changed "me" per se. I learnt a lot. I feel I have a far greater understanding of how to construct a novel, as well as what makes good writing. I feel like I finally have a voice - maybe it's not fully developed yet but I can see the beginnings of my own voice and I now know what to cut and what not to when people start critiquing the way something's written. I no longer accept all critique dished out to me because I'm confident enough to say, "Well, maybe you're wrong, maybe it's just your personal taste."

    The one thing writing has changed - it allowed me to call myself a writer. Up until I started writing my novel, I would never call myself a writer. Sure I wrote, but not seriously, and I didn't feel I deserved the title.

    Now having been through several drafts - admittedly unsuccessful drafts - but nonetheless, several drafts - I feel that I really am a writer, and no one can take that title from me, and I'm proud of it. Writing is the only thing I actually feel like I know in life - as in, claim that you know the subject matter and engage in a proper discussion. Learning to write has also opened my mind to other ways of writing - I'm no longer so fast to dismiss a book just because perhaps it is not artistic, but recognising the needs of genre and target audience, and that a good NOVEL is much more than simply good, literary writing.

    It's given me a sense of achievement. It's the only thing I've ever worked for, and persisted in, and I'm proud of myself for it.
     
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  8. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    Ha ha! That is funny, when I look at it again. :D I guess I put my statement badly. I didn't mean to imply that my characters are as memorable or as well-written as any in literature. (Good grief!)

    I only meant my characters now exist, the same as any in literature.

    No fictional character can be said to 'exist' until they've been written. Once they've been written, they do exist. And that's a cool feeling, when you realise you've just written one.

    Kind of like making babies (and almost as much fun.) They don't exist till somebody makes one. You make one. What that baby will end up doing with its life remains to be seen, but that baby now exists. Which it wouldn't do, if you hadn't made it. o_O
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014
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  9. Mackers
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    Mackers Contributing Member

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    Someone once said to me that being a writer leads to a life-time of depression and unhappiness...Any truth in that? :D
     
  10. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    Well, I'm still bouncy and cheery-tweet myself, but I've only been doing this since 1996. So it could catch up with me at some stage. Probably as soon as I get my photo taken to put on the back cover, if I ever get to the stage of getting published. I should start practicing in front of the mirror? No, that would be too depressing. I wonder if authors are allowed to have avatars on their book covers. Such a problem, I should have it...
     
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  11. Michael Collins
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    Michael Collins Contributing Member

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    I guess the only way writing could ever change me or my life is if I somehow managed to publish a best seller.

    Otherwise it's just a normal hobby, I do it because I like it, now much different from how I sweat in a gym or bake a loaf of bread.
     
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  12. Mackers
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    Mackers Contributing Member

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    Oh God...Photographs on the back of the book, that's when you know you've made it, like Stephen King.

    Hilary Mantel said that the good thing about writers is their appearances don't matter, only their thoughts. If in doubt, do a Thomas Pynchon and avoid photographs for 50 years!
     
  13. Mackers
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    Mackers Contributing Member

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    On topic though, writing has inevitably changed my way of thinking. It has been useful in compartmentalising my thoughts, ordering them in such a way so as to give me perspective on my own life, my beliefs, my ambitions - in general, what type of person I am. Beforehand I would have went through life without really any structure to my thoughts, many things thought about off-the-cuff, and lots of ideas lying more in the sub-conscious. Writing has etched what I am, and where I am, in black and white. Come to think of it, it has exposed certain aspects of me.

    I really enjoy the writing process itself, but I wouldn't say it's made me any happier. I would almost say being a writer has naturally led to me being more introspective, in a way. If there are uncomfortable things to think about, writing will tease these emotions out and end up on the page of what you're writing. That said, it's still a roller coaster of a ride sometimes. You go through a whole gamut of emotions but, in all, I think this helps you grow and mature as a person
     
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  14. obsidian_cicatrix
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    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

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    Hmmm... I notice the questions are posed in past tense. For me it's definitely an ongoing thing.

    Do I? Undoubtedly. Since I started writing, it has completely overshadowed every other single aspect of my life and what's more, I'm more than happy to let it. If I have a spare half hour, I hit the word processor rather than sit with a cuppa, passively watching whatever crud the telly companies deem fit to anesthetise my brain with. That's one obvious bonus. In many respects I feel I'm living a fuller life. I have become much more objective orientated, something I had great difficulty passing muster with in the past.

    ^This. :D My friends worry about the reclusive aspect, so I have to make a point of showing my face or else they'd worry.

    Um... if by that you mean, was there some sudden realisation of: Omigod! This is what I was born to do, not really. When I first started dabbling, it was more a case of: Ohh... I like this. Then came the gradual realisation that as beginners go, my past had already equipped me with some useful tools. It made me realise that my efforts weren't a complete waste of time. I should also tip a nod to members on this site for being supportive of me when my opinion of what I was capable of was lower than a snake's belly.

    As of now, I'm feeling quietly confident that, in time, I may actually be able to call myself a writer without feeling like a quack and a charlatan. ;)
    I have bipolar, so the ups and downs are all par for the course. Sometimes an intense writing binge will make my symptoms worse, sometimes better. Sometimes the distraction can pull me away from the brink of an up or down turn.

    On the whole, the discipline writing is teaching me is positively pouring over into my external reality. For someone with bipolar and problems with impulse control this has got to be beneficial. My urge to write overpowers the lethargy that would ordinarily drive me into my bed and under my duvet.

    I haven't the time to waste any more. There's much to be said for Art therapy, in my opinion.
     
    Last edited: Mar 27, 2014
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  15. obsidian_cicatrix
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    obsidian_cicatrix I ink, therefore I am. Contributor

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    [derailment]
    Is it just me or does @T.Trian's latest avatar look fit to grace a back cover already? Such a cool looking pic. [/derailment]
     
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  16. Mans
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    Mans Contributing Member

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    When I was a children my writing was good. Someday I wrote an article. The teacher called me randomly. I went in front of the class and read the article. The students were surprised and the teacher became angry. He reprehend me and told me," Hadn't I told you don't transcribe a book? why you did"
    I told him," But I didn't copy out any book, it is my own writing"
    As he didn't believe, shouted "plus to your fault, you are lying too? Go and seat. Your score is zero."
    Yes, that day, nobody didn't believe the writer of the article was a children.
    Anyhow, I don't feel any change because I have been always a writer but the most my defect is that I have never decided to write a complete story and never decided to offer my writings anywhere.
     
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  17. jannert
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    jannert Contributing Member Supporter Contributor

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    Oh, absolutely yes to this! This happens even when you don't set out to deal with these issues or emotions at all, but expect you're writing a completely neutral story. Neutral in the sense that it's not about your own life. Oh, yes it is...!
     
  18. Michael Collins
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    Michael Collins Contributing Member

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    I know how it feels, it happened to me in high school, the teacher was using my work as an example to explain some points about writing to another student, and she commented that I probably copied from somewhere because there was no way I could have written it.
    Teachers can be really mean, most of the ones I've met should never have the right to teach.
     
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2014
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  19. Selbbin
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    Selbbin I hate you Contributor

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    I've always been writing. It hasn't changed me, it's been a part of me, like my interest in cheese.
     
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  20. jannert
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    Wow. They chop down the poppies so the cabbages can thrive. So true...
     
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  21. thirdwind
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    thirdwind Contributing Member Contest Administrator Reviewer Contributor

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    I've gotten much better at handling criticism after becoming a writer and having others look over my work. I've also become more disciplined, more imaginative, and a deeper thinker. In short, writing has made me a better man. :)
     
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  22. Renee J
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    Renee J Contributing Member

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    Since I started writing this book, I've taken a huge interest in the novel industry. I'll read articles about publishing, articles about writing, and articles about authors. I never was that interested in information technology - where I have my day job.
     
  23. criticalsexualmass
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    criticalsexualmass Active Member

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    I've been writing for years, but I get into it then back out. I find that when I'm deep into a writing groove and it's been going on for months, I'm a happier person and better adjusted. I think it has to do with how i can write away my problems or make a character that's similar to someone i don't like and then do horrible things to him/her. I find more peace, even when I'm not at the keyboard
     
  24. JetBlackGT
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    JetBlackGT Contributing Member

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    My Mom used to do that with my artwork. "You must have traced it from a book!" No smile.
    I stopped giving her my sketches after a few of those. :-( Didn't stop drawing though! :)
     
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  25. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    Did you feel like writing changed *you*?

    ...no, not in any significant way...

    Did you feel like you became the you which you were supposed to be all along?

    ...not 'became'... just was finally doing what i was 'meant' to do, as a career...

    If you had emotional ups and downs, did writing settle them or did they get worse?

    ...didn't have 'em, other than occasional upsets caused by outside forces [such as a nasty ex-husband and unreliable lovers]... at such times, writing only provided a way to ignore them for a while, didn't ameliorate or worsen anything...
     

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