1. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    How Do You Find the Write Frame of Mind?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by Sack-a-Doo!, Feb 6, 2016.

    This is something I've always struggled with as I'm sure most do, how to get myself going when it comes time to write.

    And here are some of the solutions I've come up with. They get me into the right frame of mind:
    • I go back half a chapter (sometimes more) and start reading. By the time I catch up to where I stopped writing, I've found the mood (or maybe the mode) and is easier to get going again, and
    • (lately) I come onto this forum and read/reply to posts for about an hour before I start writing. It reminds me of what my job is and that I have a pretty good idea how to do it.
    Okay, I only have two, but they work for me.
     
  2. nhope
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    nhope Contributing Member Reviewer

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    I stop writing with half a sentence which begins the next thing I write.
     
  3. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    Right. I'd forgotten about that one. I've definitely used it.
     
  4. peachalulu
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    peachalulu Contributing Member Reviewer Contributor

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    Sometimes when I end a writing session I write a little summery of where I was taking the scene to jog my mind for the next day. Sometimes I'll re-read a scene to pick up the tone again. Sometimes I'll read a scene in a book I like just to get keyed up in the I-can-do-that mode. Other than that I just push on and write.
     
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  5. nastyjman
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    nastyjman Contributing Member

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    I free-write for five or ten minutes. I just type whatever is in my head, and that helps lubricate my writing brain.
     
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  6. Rob40
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    Rob40 Active Member

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    I either have an idea and then jump on it or I have nothing. For the nothing, usually something comes up whe scrolling past my old short entries and I decide to read one and really have to re-work it. Clean it up, fix tenses and word use, really what I have are all in various states of a first-draft. But correcting and shortening and changing things around mostly warms me up and in a way, serves as a pre-writing while also editing previous stuff that needed it anyway. So that gets me going when I feel empty.

    On occasion, something I'm really proud of comes from the 'nothing' moments. Example:
    I'm about to turn the light off and go to sleep in one of the many hotel rooms I'm in during a work week. I have a hotel note pad and pen and nothing in my head and couldn't think of anyhting at all to throw down. I think how It's bed time. As a kid, who didn't get a bed time story? We all did. There's always a bedtime story. I wonder if some of those stories were real. hmm.....and then.....off my mind went and i wrote on the subject. Tiny flash but turned out fun when I cleaned it up the next morning.

    So go over something old and fix parts here and there. You'll get something in the head to use.
     
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  7. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    This sounds like me while first drafts... the entire time while writing first drafts. :)
     
  8. nastyjman
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    nastyjman Contributing Member

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    For me, I still have hesitations or doubts even if I'm working on the first draft. Doing a quick five minute or ten minute free-write helps me get rid of that. I spill out everything just like a patient would with his psychologist.

    Also, I use it when I hit a snag in the middle of a writing session. If there's a plot problem or something bothering me in the story, I do another free-write where I talk the problem out. So far it has never failed me, and I do enjoy those moments.

    I write these things down on .txt file, which I had named "story journal." It's also fun reading them just to see what I was thinking at those times.
     
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  9. Christine Ralston
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    Christine Ralston Active Member

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    Sometimes I revise a bit of what I've written, which motivates me to write new material as it helps me regain my momentum.
     
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  10. Tenderiser
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    Tenderiser Not a man Contest Administrator Supporter Contributor

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    When I try that, I come back and think "what the hell was I going to end that with?"

    Also see my notebook with half-finished sentences ending in ??????

    It's sad, going senile at 26.
     
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  11. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    LOL. Yeah, that happened to me, too. It's why I went to art college. :)
     
  12. Samurai Jack
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    Samurai Jack Active Member

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    Storyboard, storyboard, storyboard. I have the directions printed before I start the trip.
     
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  13. zoupskim
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    zoupskim Contributing Member Contributor

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    I do a small amount of proofreading and editing in the paragraph immediately before the part I am about to write.
     
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  14. ddavidv
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    ddavidv Contributing Member

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    Re-read the last few paragraphs to remind myself where I was. Bonus points if I wrote something really freakin' amazing in the last installment.
     
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  15. KhalieLa
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    KhalieLa It's not a lie, it's fiction. Contributor

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    Glenfiddich on the rocks.
     
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  16. furzepig
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    furzepig Member

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    I often make musical playlists that are meant to evoke something about the story I'm trying to convey. That way, when I start the music up, I'm automatically put in the right frame of mind.
     
  17. GingerCoffee
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    GingerCoffee Web Surfer Girl Contributor

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    Three things work for me:

    Walking in the woods when it's warm and sunny always leaves me wanting to write when I get home.

    After six or so in the evening I use writing as an excuse to procrastinate on other work I have to do.

    And a glass of wine.
     
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  18. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    Good thinking. Turn the tables. ;)
     
  19. Lifeline
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    Lifeline The Dark - not in Wonderland Supporter Contributor

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    For me.. basically I just start writing. Gather my resolve and do it. Reading old scenes/editing is generally countraproductive, because then I never start with something fresh and the evening/morning is wasted.

    But out in the garden it starts every time. Pity that it is so cold at the moment and I can only write for an hour or so before I go in :D
    Inside writing is much, much harder. Go figure ;)
     
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  20. Sack-a-Doo!
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    Sack-a-Doo! Contributing Member Contributor

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    I hear you. Right now, it's -17C in Ottawa. Ain't no way I'd be writing outside today. :(
     
  21. Lifeline
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    Lifeline The Dark - not in Wonderland Supporter Contributor

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    Eh, I guess that is a bit too cold. Really. My condolences :(
     
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  22. MsParrish
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    MsParrish New Member

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    If I don't feel like writing, I don't. I would prefer not to write than to write garbage. Maybe your brain is telling you you need a break. I wouldn't refuse it that right. If it's something you're forced to write, then sit down at your computer and make the surroundings as comfortable and homey as possible. Play some music you think will aide that. Ergonomics play a key role, as well. Little things mean a lot. If after all these have been attempted and still the words won't come, walk away (metaphorically) and read over what you've written. Maybe you hate it and just can't get up the courage to admit it to yourself. Been there, done that... and it works every time.
     

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