1. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    How to Answer this for Covering Letter?

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Elgaisma, Jul 18, 2010.

    The Publishers I want to approach soon take direct submissions. They ask this question-

    who you think will buy your work, why, and how they can be persuaded to do so.


    My story is aimed at the 10-15/17 age group but not sure how to persuade them lol?

    Suggestions welcome
     
  2. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    I suspect the market you're considering is asking how you intend to market to your audience.

    That is about the only reason I can think of for a publisher to ask an author how to persuade readers to purchase a novel.

    Terry
     
  3. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    yes I agree just have no idea how a work gets marketed have been trying to get hold of my friend who is a librarian. Story times are the main way I can see, thanks to my time learning my craft as a dramatist and speaker I do a blinding story time, but what else is there? posters in libraries maybe a competition in the back of the book for a signed copy or something?
     
  4. TWErvin2
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    TWErvin2 Contributing Member Contributor

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    Elgaisma,

    How much time and money are you willing to invest? For example:

    How many books would be sold at a library time (or through the contact made at the event)? How many such events could you really do? How much would it cost in travel expense and time? Would it pay off, or be a drain on financial resources and time?

    Sure, there is word of mouth that would follow, and you're thinking of other methods that would work in conjunction with your efforts. I just used the library time example to illustrate the point.

    Look into this publisher carefully. They may be good and legit and a true partner--willing to do more than their part in getting your novel out there and supporting your efforts. They may not be, and end up being not much more than a 'printer' getting a cut of every book you go out and sell with very little support or effort on their part.

    The publisher may be wary of an author who thinks that all the writer does is write, and has no intention of doing any promotion--be it blog, website, signings, book readings, etc. But it is also a yellow flag (maybe not red) when what the author is going to do on the marketing side is a major concern when looking at a submission.

    Terry

    Terry
     
  5. Elgaisma
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    Elgaisma Contributing Member Contributor

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    Thank you - websites are something I can do, I am happy to blog, supply back stories etc I now have an idea of what to put in the letter. I actually think library story times can be very successful and with word of mouth, when there is a special event if its marketed correctly., My friend has a tiny little library in a very small town and now has to give tickets to his events, after having a couple events where 90+ children attended. The ones in the bigger towns don't do as well but they have stolen his ideas and are doing better:

    The publishing company are only 4 years old but they have had some good successes with books in the age group my book is aimed at (they marketed last years number 1 and number 4 Children's bestsellers in my country). They do better just within in Scotland but that's fine for me now. And they are still at the stage where they are taking in books and seriously looking at the ones they get.

    Everything I have read about them suggest they are what I would like to go for, naturally they may not accept it but I can make sure I have done everything I can:)
     
  6. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    what else is there?

    interviews on local radio/tv and in local newspapers

    book signings in bookshops/malls and at group meetings relevant to parents/children that age

    your own website/blog

    blog entries on all related blogsites

    and so on...............
     
  7. Layla
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    Layla New Member

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    If this is for kids in the tween to teen age group you might consider doing some school visits. I've not done so myself (I've been entirely too intimidated to ever even bother submitting my work to anyone as of yet), but I've heard they can be effective. It also brings to mind lectures I went to in college to hear authors. Many I'd never heard of before hearing from them, but you can bet I was often swayed to at least pick up their book and leaf through it after they did some readings.

    And as somebody who's worked in libraries for about three years, I'll say don't knock the libraries, they LOOOOOOVE to get authors to come in, especially local ones. If you want to do the library angle, milk it for all it's worth. I'm not sure what the library system is like in the UK, but in the states, a lot of public libraries typically work together, usually a universal system per county that shares items and often times programming ideas and technology. If you do one library and you're a hit, you can bet a lot of other libraries are going to hear about it and be excited when you call them up to do a program (or might even start calling you!).
     

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