1. Want2Write
    Offline

    Want2Write Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    United Kingdom

    How to avoid doubts during halfway through the book

    Discussion in 'Plot Development' started by Want2Write, Jul 18, 2011.

    I fall in the kind, where one want to write a book, and then looking for plots.

    Say I finalised a plot, did some research and have started writing. I should have a grip and love for that plot because I am going to practically live with this story line till I complete the book.

    Halfway through the book if I get a doubt like "I should have selected that another plot I thought initially.. " or "I can do much better in that other plot, than what I am doing now".

    Is this confusion normal? If so what should I do to be determined to finish the book? And also what should I do to develop the love on the plot and confidence on myself, so that I work on the book because I want to do it, and not because I have to do it as its half completed.

    Or the doubts I get are the reflection of my poor research?

    Thanks,
    W2W
     
  2. cruciFICTION
    Offline

    cruciFICTION Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Yeah, it's pretty normal. Hell, it's not even just in writing. That sort of thing happens in all kinds of human endeavours.

    It's just because you're human. I find that I'm less likely to get these doubts if I'm extremely well-vested, emotionally and such, into a plot line. If it's really a part of me, if it comes from heavy emotion, I find it easier to write and complete it.

    Pretty much everyone gets doubts.
     
  3. Want2Write
    Offline

    Want2Write Member

    Joined:
    May 31, 2011
    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    5
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    Phew thats a relief... Thanks... :)

    So I think if the research part is strong, then I am bound to be emotionally attached to the part...

    I think this one holds good if the plot resembles a lot our day to day life... or our past... i.e., something we actually gone through or seen somebody else had gone through...

    The plot I am currently contemplating is of pure imagination, not something happening in real life... So I guess Research! Research ! Researchhhhhh!...

    What do you think?

    W2W
     
  4. Heather
    Offline

    Heather Contributing Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2010
    Messages:
    338
    Likes Received:
    19
    Location:
    London
    I too fall into the category of doubting my plots. I always start creating my plot with a 'full-steam-ahead' sort of attitude; spend a few weeks researching, creating characters, settings, basically creating the world it is going to be set in. I start writing, then several chapters in I start to doubt that my plot is actually up to much, and scrap the whole thing. I have yet to write a full novel from first to last page . . . . .

    I think it comes down to how much you believe in your plot, deep down. If you doubt it, but then can think of reasons to keep it, and are confident that you can eventually make it work, then go for it, and just push past the doubts. However, there is no point kidding yourself if your plot just isn't very good. That is a call for the individual to make, however.
     
  5. Mckk
    Offline

    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Dec 30, 2010
    Messages:
    4,749
    Likes Received:
    2,534
    It's normal - I'm constantly rewriting bits because of this... not the best I know.

    Well, I keep to the main plot - and I'm able to do that only because I'd spent so bloody long trying to think of a reason for every last thing in the novel. I didn't want silly "plot devices" where things happen "just because the wizard says so". Everyone is a certain way because of something. I know that's the basics of writing anything - but in any case, it means I've spent so long thinking about it, I just can't throw it all away after so much effort lol!

    But as for doubts - sometimes the doubts are valid. For example, I was stuck on a scene because I realised I should've put an old scene MUCH earlier, before the point I got to. But as it is, the old scene wasn't even part of my draft yet. And I sat there being stuck because I knew it couldn't work like that - the old scene needs to be in there.

    So I made a mental note (and a little typed note inside my MS) to insert that scene and incorporate it later, only once I've finished my first draft.

    So now that I've got a solution in my head to my dilemma, I can happily write on :D

    If in doubt about certain scenes - sequence of events, whether a scene should even be there - I'd say just leave a note to yourself to look at it later, and move on. If you can't move on without fixing it somehow, then select the entire scene and paste it into a brand new document. Then delete the relevant scene from your MS, making sure you leave a MARK so you know you must come back to fix it later. And then move on.

    As for doubting the core plot of your story - well, I'd say re-read everything you've written so far. Re-read all your notes, all your planning, all your odd scenes here and there. Refresh your own memory - remember WHY you loved this in the first place. Remember why you wanted to write it a few months ago. When you re-read your own story, it comes alive to you as well, and it inspires you and then you see what a gem it could be - and when you see the potential it has, it's impossible to give it up ;)
     
  6. whitefairy24601
    Offline

    whitefairy24601 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 13, 2011
    Messages:
    38
    Likes Received:
    2
    I always have points in which I question my plots. It's normal. Sometimes you have to plow through it, but sometimes it's best to change things up. When I write I book I start out with one idea, but it's only the thread of that idea that makes it all the way through.
    As you come up with more sub plots and characters you will begin to doubt what you already came up with, but as a writer you have to go with you gut. Whether you change it or not however, keep up with the story!
     
  7. nickvsshark
    Offline

    nickvsshark New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2011
    Messages:
    9
    Likes Received:
    0
    I think cruciFICTION hit the nail on the head when he said it was a normal part of human endeavors. I think we tend to overcompensate against our own tastes. We have a fear that we only think it's good because we created it, and try to push it towards something that we think is universally likable. But I say just go with your gut on it.
     
  8. Steerpike
    Offline

    Steerpike Felis amatus Supporter Contributor

    Joined:
    Jul 5, 2010
    Messages:
    11,051
    Likes Received:
    5,256
    Location:
    California, US
    I don't doubt my plots, by and large. If I have any doubts, it comes to the execution of them, and I end up going back over the writing to see how well I've managed it. It could be that your doubt of the plot is really dissatisfaction with how you've executed it.
     
  9. cruciFICTION
    Offline

    cruciFICTION Contributing Member Contributor

    Joined:
    May 18, 2011
    Messages:
    1,236
    Likes Received:
    49
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    I didn't say that. I said that if I'm emotionally attached to it, it's harder for me to quit. Research is a logical construct, and emotions are not. The two are basically mutually exclusive.
     

Share This Page