1. MissRis
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    MissRis Contributing Member

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    How would you describe this image?

    Discussion in 'General Writing' started by MissRis, Apr 25, 2012.

    Hi all;

    I'm needing help describing this image.

    HecatesWheel.jpg

    It's called Hecate's Wheel - Hecate was a Goddess in Greek mythology, but existed much before then. She is a prominent feature of the novel that I am working on and I want to use the image as a symbol for the world I have created. My problem is I can't think of a way to describe it. Any help would be much appreciated.
    Thanks
     
  2. sunwave
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    sunwave Member

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    Hm... that's a hard one indeed. I'm thinking of some descriptions, but they're all just a bit off. Still I can try:

    A small, round symbol. Inside is another circle, folded inwards on three sides, as if it's a path in a hedge maze like one would find in a garden. (I'm not sure if you have things like that in your setting). Then, finally, in the middle a pointy dot, or one could describe it as a star.

    If the symbol is very important, you can also put it as a picture on the cover? Or on one of the first pages (before the story). I'm not sure how to describe it accurately either.
     
  3. Mckk
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    Mckk Moderator Staff Supporter Contributor

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    If it's a symbol, you must have one distinguishing feature within your description so that every time the symbol occurs, you don't need to describe it all over again, and can just refer to the single detail.

    A circular symbol that resembled a wheel with three spokes, spreading outwards to form slim wings. In the centre was a spinning sun sat atop a smaller circle. The Hecate's Wheel.
     
  4. Breaker
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    Breaker New Member

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    In Greek mythology Hecate (Εκάτη) comes in three forms (she's three-faced) and every part of a symbol represent one face or the goddess and that's why the symbol has three parts, it's like you are watching this statue from above:

    [​IMG]

    Try to use the fact that she's a mystery even for Olympians, because she was in Theogony, the making of Gods.
     
  5. MissRis
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    MissRis Contributing Member

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    @ sunwave - I'm glad it's not just me having difficulties with it.

    @McKK - thanks for the tip!

    @ Breaker - I think that's a really unique way of describing it.
     
  6. superpsycho
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    superpsycho Contributing Member

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    I'd assume you want a description related to the period and a spiritual context. It really depends on how your eye sees it to some degree. Since some say it represents the three aspects of a female - Maiden, Mother and Crone. Three hands encircling life? Maybe, three Hands guarding or cradling life.
     
  7. Nakhti
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    Nakhti Banned

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    Don't get so hung up on it - a vague description of a circle with a threefold shape inside it or some such would be all you need, because as soon as you've identified it the first time as Hecate's wheel, every time thereafter you just need to refer to it by name. Oh look, it's the Hecate's wheel again. Oh yeah, that circular symbol. If people are really interested to know what it looks like they'll google it for themselves.

    Or to make it really easy, using the symbol as a motif somewhere on the published product would definitely help.
     
  8. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    At what level of technology is your setting?

    In contemporary terms, I would describe it as looking like a cross section of an electric motor with a three way armature. Or perhaps lile a three bladed fan with tee-shaped blades and a circular guard ring surrounding it.

    But if it were, say, in 15th century terms, I'd have to come up with something different. The target setting changes the linguistic context considerably.
     
  9. ClusterChuck
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    ClusterChuck Senior Member

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    Who said you couldn't actually put the symbol in the text. If you read House of Leaves than you'll see pages of symbols and twisted text and colored print and foot notes in foot notes and pages with only one word on it dead center and run on sentences and imcomplete sente--

    as far as i'm concerned there are no rules when it comes to what is between your title page and final page. In this case maybe just throwing it in at just the right place would work?
     
  10. MissRis
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    MissRis Contributing Member

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    I actually have the spiritual aspect covered. It was more a literal description of the image. Although I do like "three hands guarding life," since the people from this world guard humans.

    @Cogito - It's a contemporary teenage girl who is not from the world describing it. I don't think the motor reference would work - I don't even know what a "three way armature is" haha.
     
  11. MissRis
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    MissRis Contributing Member

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    I haven't read House of Leaves, but I don't think that would work necessarily in the genre I am writing (YA). I may be able to put the image in, but usually that sort of thing isn't done in this genre of writing.
     
  12. The Tourist
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    The Tourist Banned

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    I don't know what you call them, but I know them as 'mosaic pins.' They are the decorative fasteners used in finer cutlery.

    I've always wonndered about where the design came from. It looked like the intertwined decoration I saw on Norse implements. And since many of these pins are used on knives with antique ivory, I figured it came from horn or whale-bone used on their local swords.

    http://www.northcoastknives.com/northcoast_knives_tutorials_hints_tips4.htm
     
  13. superpsycho
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    superpsycho Contributing Member

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    In that case It looks like three feet made into a wheel.
     
  14. thecoopertempleclause
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    thecoopertempleclause Contributing Member

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    It looks to me like a very small-scale game of Hungry Hungry Hippos.
     
  15. jazzabel
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    jazzabel Contributing Member Contributor

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    Reminds me of a biohazard sign.
     
  16. Jhunter
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    Jhunter Mmm, bacon. Contributor

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    Why not just call it a Hecate symbol and let your readers look it up if they don't know what it is. Or, put the actual symbol in the text.
     
  17. GaleSkies
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    GaleSkies Active Member

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    If you are looking for a technical word to describe it I'd call it a three pronged swastika. Maybe throw in a few more details if you want people to have a clearer picture. A three pronged swastika with arms curving to each side wrapped within a circle.

    But, I'm the type that pounces on any chance to remind people that swastika is just a word or symbol. I remember a tattoo parlor that had a book on swastikas, there were too many different kinds for me to even count.
     
  18. Cogito
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    Cogito Former Mod, Retired Supporter Contributor

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    Manuscripts are all text. No illustrations. If the piece is accepted, you can suggest the appearance to the publisher. They may or may not include an illustration, at their discretion.
     
  19. simplyrachel
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    simplyrachel Member

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    it looks rather demonic to me. like a cult sign or something. LOL!
     
  20. Carthonn
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    Carthonn Active Member

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    A dot like the sun, surrounded by three connected flat-top mushrooms, set inside within a circle.
     
  21. MissRis
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    MissRis Contributing Member

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    Yeah, the swastika is a funny symbol because most people associate it with nazi's, but the nazi's actually appropriated it from Buhddism, Janism, and Hindu religion. The Nazi's just flipped it from the "right-facing" and took out the four dots. If you're interested: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Swastika
     
  22. aimeekath
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    aimeekath Senior Member

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    A lot of the descriptions I've read so far are pretty good, I suppose you'll have to play around with it until it's right. If the symbol is really important it could be on the cover. Also, the thing about including the symbol on the page? I've seen it done in YA, Anthony Horowitz does that kind of thing in the Alex Rider series and also in the Circle of Five series.
     
  23. MissRis
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    MissRis Contributing Member

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    Yeah, I've gotten a few great ideas based on some of the descriptions. I didn't know how to describe the maze-like thing in it, but this forum has been great help!
     
  24. Breaker
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    Breaker New Member

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    I just looked at some Greek site (http://www.12830.gr/gia-thn-ellhnikh-thrhskeia/ekath-theologia.html) and they say that this sign represents μετεμψύχωσιν which means "the transmitting/transmigation/transfer of souls" cause she was the goddess who had a lot of rights and he even helped Zeus in liberating the Demeter from Hades underground. Zeus had a lot of respect toward Ekati and they also say that she has three faces: dog face, lion face and female horse face. You can also use that for helping you describe. The circular symbol which looks like moving of souls. Wombling around... Like this ----> deBroglie-1024x361.jpg
     

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