1. Shadow Dragon
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    Shadow Dragon Contributing Member Contributor

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    I want your opinion on something.

    Discussion in 'Publishing' started by Shadow Dragon, Oct 26, 2008.

    Ok, I've decided that Tom Doherty Associates, LLC (which owns Tor Books and multiple other publishers) will be the first place I send in my submission. They ask for a cover letter, synopsis, a self adressed stamped envelope and the first three chapters or if they are long then send the first forty to sixty pages provided it's under ten-thousand words. They take four to six months to reply due to the number of submission they get each year.

    So I have the plot of my novel completely figured out and out-lined but as far as actually typing it up goes, so all that needs to be done is actually typing it out. At this moment finishing up my third chapter tonight out of the total thirteen chapters. Going at my current rate (at least two thousand words a day) I should finish it well before half the time it takes them to reply.

    So I was thinking about going ahead and sending in my submission now (or when I get a ink cartridge for my printer) and finishing up the novel while waiting for a reply. Do you guys think that's a good idea or should I complete my novel and then send in the submission?
     
  2. Scarlett_156
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    Scarlett_156 Active Member

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    DON'T do it. Try to find a good reputable agent who can help you, don't cold submit something to a major publisher like Tor--they are a good company, mind you!--without professional help.

    I'm saying this because I want for you to keep writing. If you submit your work to this publisher now you'll wait forever and then find out that it's been rejected, and you'll be discouraged.

    DON'T do it. Finish your work. Spend some time with it. Love it, care about it, be nit-picky about it. Get a good agent to go over it for you, and recommend publishers that might like it. You'll be glad you did. yours in Chaos, Scarlett
     
  3. Emerald
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    Emerald Contributing Member

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    I hate literary agents. Bloody useless middlemen they is! (No offence to any of you on this site. You can't help being bloodsuckers)

    It's a sweet deal, isn't it? No publishers will accept manuscripts without an agent's name on it. If it weren't for that little fact, they could be replaced by a computer program. Which would be infinitely more efficient: you email your story to the agent-bot, it analyses it in 2 nanoseconds and either rejects it or sends it to the appropriate publishers. Hell, a robot would probably be more creative and varied in its choices than a literary agent :p All they bother with are slashers and chick lit nowadays...


    (But ultimately Scar's right. You need one. And you should fully realise your novel before you send it to be hacked up)
     
  4. Scarlett_156
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    Scarlett_156 Active Member

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    I don't like agents, either. I don't have an agent myself. But for a new writer who hasn't finished a single work yet to cold submit something to a publisher is just asking for trouble.

    Yes: Most agents who are listed are dishonest. It takes almost as much energy to find a good agent as it does to write a book.

    Write your book first, get some help in editing it, find an agent--and take it from there. xoxo
     
  5. Emerald
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    Emerald Contributing Member

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    The amount of good, talented writers I know who have been screwed over by lazy, disinterested or downright incompetent agents... They always have a favourite client that they devote 90% of their time to...
     
  6. marina
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    marina Contributing Member Contributor

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    Wait until you've written the whole thing, then send it off. Don't be fixed on writing a book to get published, be fixated and obsessed right now on your story. Focus all on the tale.
     
  7. Torana
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    Torana Contributing Member Contributor

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    write the piece first, edit it, then look into the submission process once that is done. If you submit something you haven't written and written well... you will be in for a mjor let down when they reject it after saying they are interested in reading more.

    Getting published can be a right B***H. But you are best to start trying once you have a completed piece to submit, rather than one you started but haven't finished. I mean what if for a month or two you can't seem to think of what to write? Then they say we want to see it all and you haven't got it? They'd be pretty peeved off. Finish the piece, then submit it. Don't opt for an easy way out and end up screwing yourself over.

    Torana
     
  8. Shadow Dragon
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    Shadow Dragon Contributing Member Contributor

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    Yeah, I am going to wait until I finish it, which will probably be in early December. Thanks for the advice guys.
     
  9. Rei
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    Rei Contributing Member Contributor

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    You always want to make sure you have completed it first. One of the reasons is just the practicality of it. Okay, so you know that they take four to six months to respond and generally at the rate you're going, you should finish it by the time you get your response. But what if stuff gets in the way and you can't work as much as you had planned, or you discover that the story needs more work than you had anticipated? Then you get your response and they want to see the whole thing. It's not finished, so you are going to have to make them wait. That's really not something you want to do.
     
  10. mammamaia
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    mammamaia nit-picker-in-chief Contributor

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    scarlet and emerald, you both seem to be totally clueless about real agents... sure, there are a jillion scam artists out there pretending to be agents, but the genuine articles more than justify their 10-15% cut by doing a lot more than just sending their clients' work to publishers... i'm not going to explain it all to you here, since it's pretty clear from your posts that you don't want to deal with reality...

    i happen to have known a lot of major authors in my old life, all of whom swore by their agents and what they did for them and had an agent of my own who did all i could want and more... so, please don't scare new writers off, making them think they shouldn't trust a good agent, even though you toss in at the end of your screeds that they might need one...

    shadow...
    yes, you DO need to finish your novel before you approach either an agent or a publisher... no one is going to assume a new, unknown writer will be able to write a marketable book, so why would they take you on before you have the whole thing completed and ready for them to take a look at?
     
  11. Sylvester
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    Sylvester Member

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    I agree that you should wait until your work is complete and you are 100% satisfied with it before you submit it. I for one have writen up several ideas and then find better ideas to "improve" it. A little change her means a little change there. The next thing you know, the Western you submitted is a 1930's detective novel.

    Write the story and then worry about submitting it to anyone.
     

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